#8
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  • Demonetizing on YouTube
  • Twitter’s political labels
  • Journalists vs coronavirus
  • Trump’s census ad
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Foreign Policy ($)
From Beijing to Washington, governments have been muzzling scientists, inflating the success of their containment efforts, and discrediting valid reporting. Citizens have to fight back.

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Medium
It’s Sunday, March 8. Two of America’s best journalism organizations are featuring deep looks into the confusion, incompetence, and outright malfeasance that has marked the Trump administration’s “response” to the accelerating spread of Covid-19.

Editor’s Note: The coronavirus “infodemic” is on social networks, but it has also highlighted problems with traditional media. Here Dan Gilmor talks about putting journalistic resources to their best use.

First Draft News
It’s in your family WhatsApp group, all over Twitter and clogging up our news feeds. Here are five quick things we can do to verify content online before we share.

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The New Republic
The father of the founder of the conspiratorial site filed a criminal complaint against me in Bulgaria. Then things got weird.

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PanDaily
On March 4, the US Senate Subcommittee on Crime and Terrorism held a hearing titled, “Dangerous Partners: Big Tech and Beijing”. Chaired by Senator Hawley, the hearing focused on data security threats facing US citizens from Chinese companies like ByteDance’s TikTok. We caught up with two expert witnesses, Derek Scissors and Samm Sacks, to reflect on the hearing and analyze the future of US-China tech relations.

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Evolution Institute
All of my work over the past three years had come down to this moment. David Bernick, the wiry little high-paid lawyer for Brown and Williamson Tobacco Company, was cross-examining me with the air of a skilled hunter about to eviscerate his prey. Others told me he was nasty and clever, that his law firm billed $1,000 an hour for his time, and that he had won many high-profile cases. I, on the other hand, had never even testified in federal court. He was going to skewer me like a piece of meat.

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The Conversation
Science gets a lot of respect these days. Unfortunately, it’s also getting a lot of competition from misinformation. Seven in 10 Americans think the benefits from science outweigh the harms, and nine in 10 think science and technology will create more opportunities for future generations. Scientists have made dramatic progress in understanding the universe and the mechanisms of biology, and advances in computation benefit all fields of science.

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The Guardian
Containing the epidemic requires both reliable news coverage and truth from the president

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Patch
Store shelves empty of hand sanitizer and survival staples, jacked-up prices by online sellers, and a volatile stock market offer a snapshot of America gripped by a virus that mental health experts warn is potentially more dangerous than the coronavirus itself: the pandemic of fear.

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CNN
A recent scientific article suggested that the novel coronavirus responsible for the Covid-19 epidemic has mutated into a more “aggressive” form. Is this something we need to worry about? No, and here’s why.

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Gizmodo
YouTube creators from gaming commentators to Perez Hilton have been raising hell over the past month after realizing that the platform is demonetizing any content mentioning the coronavirus.

Editor’s Note: YouTube has attempted to limit misinformation by delinking its money and coronavirus. Here Gizmodo looks at the linguistic contortions its inspired.

Reuters
Facebook Inc on Thursday removed ads by President Donald Trump’s re-election campaign that asked users to fill out an “Official 2020 Congressional District Census” because the ads violate the company’s policy against misinformation on the government’s census.

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News Collab
What does “fake news” actually mean? Not much. Here’s how one journalism student tried to recognize the elements of information disorder in her own life.

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Mainichi
TOKYO — The spread of the new coronavirus has been a catalyst for dubious information to make the rounds on social media sites including Twitter.

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The Conversation
Vitamin C is a common remedy that some people believe will cure the common cold and flu. Although it helps us maintain good immune function, there’s little evidence that it can prevent or substantially reduce either of these diseases. But in the midst of the novel coronavirus outbreak, some “influencers” are claiming that taking mega-doses of vitamin C can cure COVID-19 (the disease caused by novel coronavirus).

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Foreign Policy ($)
MUMBAI – Worried about the coronavirus? Well, just turn to the ever-useful cow. On March 2, Suman Haripriya, an elected member of the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), said that cow urine and cow dung could be used to combat the outbreak. Chakrapani Maharaj, a Hindu leader, told a news site he would be organizing an event to educate people on the use of cow products to fight the disease.

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Global Voices
“Jamaica has recognized the independence of Kosovo” – the story echoed widely in the small Balkan nation and the wider region on February 20. After high-profile Kosovar officials, including President Hashim Thaçi, enthusiastically announced the news, the media promptly picked it up. To this day, only about half of the world’s countries recognize Kosovo as a sovereign state.

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PR Week
A PR firm’s survey with dubious methodology and scaremongering headline findings provided the backdrop for a depressing cautionary tale about how quick clicks and not robust journalism are driving modern media

Editor’s Note: Those of you who read our Deepnews Digest on coronavirus-specific misinformation last week may have read criticism of the Corona beer-focused poll. Here Steve Barrett in PR Week writes about the effects.

GIJN
The new coronavirus has already become the biggest story in our world — reaching more than 100 countries, killing 4,262, and infecting more than 118,101, according to the latest numbers from the Johns Hopkins University & Medicine COVID-19 map. This global public health emergency — one of the six declared in recent years by the World Health Organization (WHO), beginning with the 2009 Swine flu — has already wiped out billions of dollars from the global economy, and according to Bloomberg could eventually cost the economy a total of $2.7 trillion.

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Indian Express
People either dismiss the crisis or avoid scientific measures of control and containment as they put their trust in fake news. A public caution and literacy about how to trust information online are needed.

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Digital Forensics Research Lab
In the weeks following the death of James Le Mesurier in early November 2019, both new and old narratives peddling misinformation circulated online.

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Mashable
If you’ve ever seen a Twitter account and wondered if it belonged to someone who’s running for public office, but you didn’t feel like reading their bio or Googling them, this is a great week for you.

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Irish News
THE Covid-19 virus did not take long to reach our shores. Last month in this column I posed the question: Should businesses panic? The obvious answer of course, is no, as panic achieves little. But neither should they have their collective proverbial head in the sand.

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JSTOR Daily
How do innocuous words become insidious in the face of a public health emergency?

Editor’s Note: Coronavirus has spread rapidly, along with the language we use to talk about it. Here digital library JSTOR tackles the issue on its daily blog.

National Post
Disinformation about COVID-19 online has prompted government agencies and social media platforms to quell rumours about fake ‘cures’

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