#9
single distill image banner

  • Facebook’s AI reaction to virus
  • Quarantine and social media
  • Censorship at TikTok
  • Russian troll case dropped


Selection and ranking powered by

deepnews logo


Story Source
CNN

Accra, Ghana – The Russian trolls are back — and once again trying to poison the political atmosphere in the United States ahead of this year’s elections. But this time they are better disguised and more targeted, harder to identify and track. And they have found an unlikely home, far from Russia itself.


Editor’s Note:


The Conversation

From an ethical perspective, covering the coronavirus story is really hard to do well. The reason for this lies in an inherent conflict between two ethical obligations: the obligation to truth-telling and the obligation not to add unjustifiably to public anxiety.


Editor’s Note:


Global Voices

In a tweet posted on Friday, March 13, Chinese foreign ministry spokesperson Zhao Lijian implied that the United States Army might have brought the novel coronavirus to China. His comment has escalated into a online conspiracy theory being circulated widely on Chinese social media, and even being repeated by Chinese diplomats.


Editor’s Note:


The Guardian

We’re fighting an ‘infodemic’ as well as a pandemic. A bit of online self-discipline is urgently required


Editor’s Note:


Coda Story

In 2014, dozens of teenage girls at a school in the Colombian town of El Carmen de Bolivar collapsed and had seizures. Within a day, the whole school was affected. Mass collapses such as this one are more common than you might think. One pupil faints and others quickly follow, in a fear-fueled domino effect. Typically, these crisis-moments are over in a day. But that hasn’t happened in Colombia. Six years on, girls at the school are still fainting. After making exhaustive investigations, local doctors have confidently diagnosed this as a case of “Mass Psychogenic Illness” — or, to put it in simpler language, mass hysteria.


Editor’s Note:


The coronavirus crisis has highlighted the role of experts such as medical researchers in society. Here Suzanne O’Sullivan, a neurologist, writes for Coda Story.

Reuters

Facebook Inc (FB.O) and Twitter Inc (TWTR.N) said on Thursday they had taken down a network of Russian-linked fake accounts operated out of Ghana and Nigeria which targeted the United States.


Editor’s Note:


The Conversation

The medical evidence is clear: The coronavirus global health threat is not an elaborate hoax. Bill Gates did not create the coronavirus to sell more vaccines. Essential oils are not effective at protecting you from coronavirus.


Editor’s Note:


Gizmodo

Facebook’s automated moderation tools went wild and targeted tons of posts about the coronavirus pandemic and other topics on Tuesday evening, blocking users from sharing articles from legitimate news sources.


Editor’s Note:


AP

WASHINGTON — The Trump administration is alleging that a foreign disinformation campaign is underway aimed at spreading fear in the country amid the coronavirus pandemic, three U.S. officials said Monday.


Editor’s Note:


Mail & Guardian

Contagion has captured our collective imagination for centuries. Perhaps it’s the magnitude of the consequences, the disruption to the status quo, the rapidity and the limited control that we can exert over circumstances, or the way in which the fallibility of your average human is amplified. We try to make sense of such events by narratives: telling stories — to ourselves and to others.


Editor’s Note:


Stanford University

Stanford’s Jeff Hancock shares why deceptive messages are appealing and what people can do to avoid bad advice – including checking information from established news sources rather than social media news feeds. (Image credit: Courtesy Stanford HCI Group)


Editor’s Note:


The Intercept

The maker of TikTok, the Chinese video-sharing app with hundreds of millions of users around the world, instructed moderators to suppress posts created by users deemed too ugly, poor, or disabled for the platform, according to internal documents obtained by The Intercept. These same documents show moderators were also told to censor political speech in TikTok livestreams, punishing those who harmed “national honor” or broadcast streams about “state organs such as police” with bans from the platform.


Editor’s Note:


Unrelated to the coronavirus, different social media platforms continue to structure the online worlds they want to create. Here The Intercept dives into instructions to moderators about who TikTok wanted on the platform.

Wired

No more “underage delinquent behavior” is allowed on the social video platform that’s famously popular with teens.


Editor’s Note:


Morning Consult

According to a new Morning Consult survey conducted March 10-12, 2020, a plurality of 38 percent said social media companies are doing a “poor” job of preventing the spread of false information about coronavirus on their platforms, while another 25 percent said they were doing a “fair” job. The survey, conducted among 1,252 adults, has a margin of error of 3 percentage points.


Editor’s Note:


Reuters

The reality of the new reality is that social media has become a near-essential resource. Whether for news, shared experiences, comic relief or a heated discussion, Twitter, Facebook and Instagram have become a lifeline to many.


Editor’s Note:


The Conversation

Around the world, festivals, sporting events, conferences and community celebrations are being cancelled or postponed due to concerns over the spread of COVID-19. Event organizers have had to make difficult decisions about how to proceed, and would-be attendees question whether they should plan to go.


Editor’s Note:


University of Otago

Parents researching childhood vaccinations online are likely to encounter significant levels of negative information, researchers at the University of Otago, Wellington, have found.


Editor’s Note:


Washington Post

In the outpouring of social media messages about the coronavirus pandemic, the collective mood is grim, experts found.


Editor’s Note:


The coronavirus is playing out not just in fake news and its dangers, but in the content created by users. Here the Washington Post speaks with Manlio De Domenico, an Italian who analyzed 121 million tweets, including for sentiment.

Mashable

Creators are used to taking a beating from YouTube. They make the content that drives people to the site. They work to figure out a winning formula for their channel. And then, at the drop of a hat, YouTube can tweak a policy that completely transforms how visible their content is or how much money their channels make.


Editor’s Note:


AP

WASHINGTON — The Justice Department is moving to drop charges against two Russian companies that were accused of funding a social media campaign to sway American public opinion during the 2016 U.S. presidential election.


Editor’s Note:


The Conversation

News and views about coronavirus has spread via social media in a way that no health emergency has done before.


Editor’s Note:


The Citizen

The interministerial task team appointed to deal with the country’s coronavirus outbreak will, in the coming days, release regulations aimed at dealing with a number of issues related to the country’s current state of disaster as declared by President Cyril Ramaphosa on Sunday. This is according to the spokesperson of the ministry of justice and constitutional development, Chrispin Phiri. Speaking to The Citizen, Phiri stated that the regulations would outline what recourse government had when dealing with those who participated in the spread of coronavirus misinformation, among other things.


Editor’s Note:


AFP

American journalists at The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Wall Street Journal are told to hand back their credentials within 10 days


Editor’s Note:


NY Mag

Evidence that Americans can look to figures of authority for wisdom in dealing with the novel coronavirus is in short supply. The president can’t keep his facts straight. The vice president charged with coordinating the federal response mishandled an HIV outbreak as Indiana’s governor. The administration’s cheerleaders in positions of influence — pundits, elected officials past and present — maintain by and large that panic over the pandemic is a media conspiracy devised to tank markets and torpedo Trump’s re-election plans


Editor’s Note:


The Citizen

Scientists around the world have been working around the clock to identify the pathogen behind the new illness.


Editor’s Note:



($) = This source has a hard paywall. You will need to suscribe to view this article.