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  • Cape Canaveral to remain open
  • China tests manned spaceship
  • ESA looks for lunar water
  • Shielding planets from COVID19


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Spaceflight Now

The military-run Eastern Range at Cape Canaveral remains ready to support upcoming launches — including an Atlas 5 flight Thursday — amid the coronavirus pandemic, officials said Tuesday.


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British Vogue

As part of Vogue’s new series on pioneering women of the world, the American engineer explains what it felt like to break the record for the longest space flight ever by a woman astronaut, and why space exploration is valuable for everyone.


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NASA

Future Artemis lunar landers could use next-generation thrusters, the small rocket engines used to make alterations in a spacecraft’s flight path or altitude, to enter lunar orbit and descend to the surface.


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Teslarati

SpaceX says it encountered an issue that forced it to drop a Crew Dragon spacecraft mockup during parachute testing — not a failure of the vehicle or its parachutes, to be clear, but still a problem nonetheless.


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ESA

In response to the escalating coronavirus pandemic, ESA has decided to further reduce on-site personnel at its mission control centre in Darmstadt, Germany.


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Spaceflight Now

Concerns about the coronavirus pandemic have prompted officials to postpone the planned March 30 launch of Argentina’s SAOCOM 1B radar observation satellite from Cape Canaveral aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket, officials said Tuesday.


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CNBC

According to an internal memo, SpaceX employees are making face shields and hand sanitizer to donate to outside organizations fighting COVID-19.


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Xinhua Net

A trial version of China’s new-generation manned spaceship is being tested at the Wenchang Space Launch Center on the coast of south China’s island province of Hainan, according to the China Manned Space Agency (CMSA).


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While much of the world has been under lockdown, China continues to further its space ambitions. Xinhua Net reports that the country has been testing a manned spaceship due for launch in April.

ESA

ESA is preparing a surface sampling payload that will prospect for lunar water among other resources. It is due to be flown to the Moon aboard Russia’s Luna-27 lander in 2025.


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Inverse

SpaceX has received the thumbs-up from the Federal Communications Commission to operate up to one million ground-based Starlink terminals.


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Space News

It is obvious the tiny novel coronavirus is giving and will continue to give all of us a very hard time for a prolonged period.


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Bloomberg

The coronavirus hasn’t disrupted missions essential to tracking environmental changes.


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Spaceflight Now

Three Chinese military satellites with undisclosed missions rocketed into a 370-mile-high (600-kilometer) orbit Tuesday on a Long March 2C launcher.


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Financial Times ($)

Blue Origin, the space exploration company founded by Amazon chief executive Jeff Bezos, is to continue operating through the coronavirus crisis after being deemed an “essential” business by the US government.


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Geek Wire

OneWeb, the London-based venture that launched its latest batch of broadband internet satellites last weekend, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in New York today. “The company intends to use these proceedings to pursue a sale of its business in order to maximize the value of the company,” OneWeb said in a news release.


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Space.com

The coronavirus pandemic isn’t shrinking every part of the job market.


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SpaceX has been extremely vocal about its plans to reach Mars. Here, Mike Wall finds out that the company is on a hiring spree to build new spacecraft called Starships.

CNBC

At least one employee and one health care provider at SpaceX’s headquarters in Hawthorne, California, have tested positive for the COVID-19 coronavirus, sending some employees into quarantine.


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Teslarati

SpaceX has begun to upgrade its South Texas Starship launch pad in anticipation of the completion of the next full-scale rocket prototype, photos of which CEO Elon Musk revealed just hours ago.


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Space.com

The coronavirus pandemic has forced Rocket Lab to postpone its next mission.


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Spaceflight Now

The first launch of a U.S. Space Force mission since the establishment of the new military service is planned Thursday, when a United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket is set for liftoff from Cape Canaveral with a billion-dollar jam-resistant communications satellite designed to ensure national leaders remain connected with the armed forces.


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Universe Today

Despite humanity’s current struggle against the novel coronavirus, and despite it taking up most of our attention, other threats still exist. The very real threat of a possible asteroid strike on Earth in the future is taking a backseat for now, but it’s still there.


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Texas Standard

Like every other business or government agency, NASA is operating very differently right now because of the coronavirus pandemic. But the space agency does have ongoing missions, including a scheduled launch next month that will send astronaut Chris Cassidy and two Russian cosmonauts to the International Space Station.


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Euronews

While the Covid-19 pandemic continues to develop rapidly the world’s knowledge of contamination is rising in parallel with the sale of hand sanitizer.


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While we are all worried about the COVID-19 spread on the earth, certain scientists are aiming to protect other planets from being contaminated. Evan Bourke discusses how the Outer Space Treaty could help in protecting space bodies.

MIT

Five research payloads from the MIT Media Lab’s Space Exploration Initiative were recently deployed on the International Space Station for a 30-day research mission. Scientists, designers, and artists will be able to study the effects of prolonged microgravity, on-station radiation, and launch loads on experiments ranging from self-assembling architecture to biological pigments.


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Science

For robots to be useful for real-world applications, they must be safe around humans, be adaptable to their environment, and operate in an untethered manner.


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