#13
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  • Apollo 13 reflections (#3+#17)
  • Boeing to fly second Starliner (#8)
  • Homo Galacticus! (#12)
  • New international moon treaty? (#13)


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MIT Technology Review

We’re entering the era of satellite mega-constellations, but so far there are no rules for how to avoid collisions in orbit.


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Modern-day space companies are engaged in an ongoing battle to outdo one another. Wade Roush wonders whether this race could lead to dangerous collisions in orbit – something that could have a major impact on humans.

Spaceflight Now

A Russian Soyuz-2.1a rocket rolled out to a launch pad Monday at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, ready for the first crewed flight to use the modernized Soyuz booster configuration. Liftoff with two Russian cosmonauts and a veteran NASA astronaut is scheduled Thursday on an expedition to the International Space Station.


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WSJ ($)

Mr. Lovell was commander of Apollo 13. Mr. Bridenstine is administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


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Teslarati

SpaceX CEO Elon Musk took to Twitter to better explain what happened when the latest full-scale Starship prototype failed during one of its first tests, while later revealing the rocket engines set to power a future prototype’s first flight.


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Reuters

The Russian space agency, Roscosmos, accused Donald Trump on Tuesday of creating a basis to take over other planets by signing an executive order outlining U.S. policy on commercial mining in space.


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AFP

A three-man crew docked successfully at the International Space Station Thursday, leaving behind a planet overwhelmed by the coronavirus pandemic.


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Universe Today

In the coming years, NASA plans to return astronauts to the Moon as part of Project Artemis. However, the long-term goal is to establish a sustainable program for lunar exploration, as well as a permanent human presence on the Moon.


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Spaceflight Now

Boeing officials said Monday the company’s Starliner crew capsule will fly a second time without astronauts after software problems and other issues plagued a first test flight in December, preventing the ship from reaching the International Space Station.


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Universe Today

In the near future, sample-return missions from Mars will finally be a reality. For decades, scientists have analyzed the composition of Martian rocks and soil by either sending rovers to the surface or by examining meteorites that came from Mars. But with missions like Perseverance, which are equipped with a sample cache instrument, it won’t be long before Martian rocks are brought back to Earth for study.


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Space News

SAN FRANCISCO – The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration awarded eight contracts with a combined total of nearly $4.5 million to companies developing mission concepts, spacecraft and instruments for the agency’s future Earth observation constellation.


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UC San Diego

UC San Diego and Space Tango receive NASA award to develop first dedicated stem cell research laboratory within the International Space Station.


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Science Alert

Human evolution is complicated, to say the least. It’s complicated by love, which makes us want to keep people alive. It’s complicated by science and technology, which give us the power to do so. It’s complicated, sometimes, by politics. And it’s complicated by our environment, which is relatively stable, meaning we haven’t needed many significant adaptations for thousands of years.


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Articles in Over the Moon have dealt with changes to the human body before, but what about when humans become long-term space residents rather than just visitors? Here Michelle Starr speaks to researchers about the potential effects on body parts like bones.

Tech Crunch

The international community has struggled for decades to formalize rules regarding the collection and use of resources in space and on the Moon. While the U.S. and all spacefaring countries declined to endorse the most famous attempt, the 1979 “Moon Treaty,” the new Moon race has spurred the White House to announce it is open to a new international agreement on the topic.


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Food and Agricultural Organization of the UN

Rome – Italy’s celebrated Paolo Nespoli spent his 63 birthday sharing with FAO’s global staff his experience of confinement as a career astronaut. Hundreds tuned in from home isolation to watch him expound on the analogy between spacecraft seclusion and coronavirus-induced lockdown.


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MIT

“I’ll never forget the moment when I first saw new Cassini data come down from Titan’s surface,” says Samuel Birch. “I was in awe at witnessing this brand new, never-seen-before bit of our solar system.”


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Syfy

Bennu is a half-kilometer-wide pile of rocks that NASA’s OSIRIS-REx spacecraft has been investigating since it arrived at the asteroid in late 2018. The surface looks like the rubble from a construction site, but there are some features there that stick out enough to be noticeable.


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Inside Sources

Fifty years ago this month, the world held its breath — hoping, praying and wishing for a miracle that would spare the lives of a crew stranded in the most hostile and remote of conditions.


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The Apollo 13 mission recently marked its fifty-year anniversary. Here, Tom Zelibor dissects the key aspects of the mission and discusses how it continues to be influential. Above, check out the WSJ piece that includes Apollo 13 commander Jim Lovell as an author.

CBS News

Working amid coronavirus restrictions, engineers readied a Soyuz spacecraft for launch Thursday to ferry two Russian cosmonauts and Navy SEAL-turned-NASA-astronaut Chris Cassidy to the International Space Station.


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The Register

Anti-mortar system specs, legal paperwork, payment forms, and more, dumped online from infected PCs.


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Space.com

The European-Japanese BepiColombo mission will whiz past our planet in the wee hours of Friday (April 10) as the spacecraft continues on its long journey toward Mercury.


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Universe Today

When the Artemis III mission lands on the lunar surface in 2024, it will be the first time in over 50 years that astronauts will have set foot on the Moon. Unlike last time, where the Apollo missions left behind a flag and several science experiments, NASA hopes that Artemis will serve as a stepping stone towards the creation of a permanent human presence on the Moon.


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Tech Times

Our universe might not be expanding at the same speed in all directions, according to new research released by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and European Space Agency (ESA) observatories.


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UPI

SpaceX’s Dragon cargo capsule splashed down in the Pacific Ocean on Tuesday, carrying live mice, cells of plants grown in space and spacesuits to be examined and refurbished.


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TASS

President Vladimir Putin named Russia’s interaction with the United States in space industry as a successful example of international cooperation, adding that he also plans new conversations with foreign partners on oil market issues. The president talked to the ISS crews via a video link from his residence in Novo-Ogaryovo, the Moscow Region.


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Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

TROY, N.Y. — An instrument currently aboard the International Space Station could grow E. coli bacteria in space, opening a new path to bio-manufacturing drugs during long term space flights. Research published today in Nature Microgravity used an Earth-bound simulator of the space station instrument to grow E. coli, demonstrating that it can be nurtured with methods that promise to be more suitable for space travel than existing alternatives.


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