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  • SpaceX braces for launch
  • Noctilucent cloud season (#21)
  • New type of asteroid (#6)
  • Magnetic field weakening (#21)


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Washington Post

One was a venerable giant with a legacy in aerospace that stretched back more than 100 years and a role in every major moment in NASA’s history. The other was a relative upstart that in its early days was derided as little more than a delusional billionaire’s fantasy and that critics said was building its rockets out of wax and rubber bands.


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The big news this week is the SpaceX launch, which features multiple times on our list. Here Christian Davenport reports for the Washington Post on how SpaceX disrupted what many people thought was Boeing’s race to lose.

CNN

Astronomers have spotted a massive disk galaxy, not unlike our own, that formed 12.5 billion years ago when our 13.8 billion-year-old universe was only a tenth of its current age. But according to what scientists know about galaxy formation, this one has no business being in the distant universe.


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Space News

On April 30, NASA announced the award of close to $1 billion in funds split between three companies to develop human landing systems for its Artemis moon base program. The companies were SpaceX, which proposed a variant of its Starship reusable launch system, and teams led by Blue Origin and Dynetics, which each offered much smaller dedicated lunar landing and ascent vehicles.


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Associated Press

CAPE CANAVERAL – For the first time in nearly a decade, U.S. astronauts are about to blast into orbit aboard an American rocket from American soil. And for the first time in the history of human spaceflight, a private company is running the show.


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UPI

ORLANDO – NASA expects to meet a crucial deadline to launch Mars rover Perseverance in July as technicians and engineers work under tight restrictions during the COVID-19 pandemic.


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University of Hawaii

Asteroids and comets are often thought of as distinct types of small bodies, but astronomers have discovered an increasing number of “crossovers.” These objects initially appear to be asteroids, and later develop activity, such as tails, that are typical of comets.


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Florida Today

It’s not every day that you get to see your husband fly to space. And it’s even more unusual when you can relate to that experience, as well.


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The Guardian

The launch of the billionaire’s vessel will be the first manned US flight since shuttle missions were shut down nine years ago.


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Bloomberg

As the space agency prepares to bring home Martian soil samples, it needs to update its planetary-protection rules — and soon.


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Scientific American

The Artemis Accords could ensure a peaceful and prosperous future for lunar exploration—if everyone agrees to them.


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The other big news this week is continued analysis of the Artemis Accords. Here Leonard David breaks it down for the Scientific American, including blowback from countries such as Russia.

Popular Mechanics

Elon Musk is making waves after agreeing with an analysis that his plans to terraform Mars would require 10,000 maximum payload nuclear missiles based on today’s technology.


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UPI

Weather has become a major concern for the planned launch of two American astronauts Wednesday from Kennedy Space Center in Florida in the first crewed mission from U.S. soil in nine years.


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Teslarati

Mission objectives of the SpaceX Crew Dragon Demo-2 test flight, have already commenced days ahead of the scheduled launch attempt. On Wednesday, May 27th at 4:33 pm EDT, Elon Musk’s rocket launching – and landing – company, SpaceX, will set out to achieve more firsts than it has ever attempted in one launch.


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The Times (UK) ($)

We are all on lockdown but some of us are looking at the stars.


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POLITICO

NASA’s human spaceflight chief has resigned just days before the agency is slated to launch astronauts into space from American soil for the first time in almost a decade.


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BBC

On Wednesday, the California company SpaceX will launch a mission to the International Space Station (ISS). It’s something the firm has done many times before, taking cargo to the sky-high laboratory. But on this occasion, the firm will be transporting people.


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MIT Technology Review

The Artemis program is supposed to usher in a new age of lunar mining, especially for water ice. But how, exactly?


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Ars Technica

When NASA astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken blast off inside a Crew Dragon spacecraft later this month, they will not only launch into space. They will also inaugurate a potentially transformative era for the space agency.


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While there has been a lot of reporting around the scheduled SpaceX launch, few pieces have focused on the economic implications of NASA’s move to commercial space exploration. Eric Berger argues that this move has proven to be cost-effective.

Space.com

If all goes well with Demo-2, Crew Dragon and SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket will be validated for operational crewed missions, the first of which is expected to launch later this year.


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NASA

NASA is resuming work on a series of tests to bring the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket core stage to life for the first time, allowing engineers to evaluate the new complex stage that will launch the Artemis I lunar mission.


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Space Weather Archive

NASA’s AIM spacecraft has detected a noctilucent cloud (NLC) inside the Arctic Circle–the first of the 2020 summer season.


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Webb Telescope

Researchers will observe far-flung asteroids, some with moons, to learn more about the makeup and history of our solar system.


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Independent (UK)

The Earth’s magnetic field is weakening between Africa and South America, causing issues for satellites and space craft.


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Associated Press

In ordinary times, the beaches and roads along Florida’s Space Coast would be packed with hundreds of thousands of spectators, eager to witness the first astronaut launch from Florida in nine years.


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NASA

NASAs Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) is now named the Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope, after NASAs first Chief of Astronomy.


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