#20
single distill image banner

  • America’s back in space (#4)
  • Lessons for ISRO (#13)
  • Future of space business (#7)
  • ‘Wakeup call’ in Russia (#15)


Selection and ranking powered by

deepnews logo


Story Source
New York Times

It took work across three presidencies, those of George W. Bush, Barack Obama and Donald J. Trump, but the United States is at last prepared once again, after nearly a decade, to launch American astronauts into orbit from American soil on an American-built rocket.


Editor’s Note:


The collaboration between SpaceX and NASA and the agency’s move towards commercial flight has the potential to radically transform the space industry. Here Kenneth Chang writes about the behind-the-scenes efforts that resulted in this new era of spaceflight.

Spaceflight Now

Two veteran NASA astronauts rocketed away from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Saturday to begin a test flight of a new commercial spaceship designed, built and owned by SpaceX.


Editor’s Note:


Financial Express

With big businesses taking a keen interest in its commercial use, the space race is set to get more heated in the future.


Editor’s Note:


Wall Street Journal ($)

Since the Space Shuttle’s final mission, in July 2011, the U.S. has relied on Russia’s Soyuz to transport NASA crew members to and from the ISS. After 30 years and two catastrophic accidents, it was time to retire the shuttle. But NASA failed multiple times to develop a replacement. The Obama administration canceled George W. Bush’s Constellation project, and with it the affordable Ares 1 rocket, based on shuttle technology. Instead they chose to build on the Commercial Orbital Transportation System contracts and gave Boeing and SpaceX responsibility for the spacecraft. The plan was to have the Boeing Starliner and the SpaceX Crew Dragon ready in 2017.


Editor’s Note:


CBS News

Opening a new chapter in American spaceflight, two veteran space shuttle fliers will blaze a fresh trail to orbit aboard a SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft Wednesday, weather permitting — the first launch of American astronauts from U.S. soil since the space shuttle’s final flight nearly nine years ago.


Editor’s Note:


Associated Press

A rocket ship built by Elon Musk’s SpaceX company thundered away from Earth with two Americans on Saturday, ushering in a new era in commercial space travel and putting the United States back in the business of launching astronauts into orbit from home soil for the first time in nearly a decade.


Editor’s Note:


Bloomberg

A half-century ago, the U.S. sent Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin to the moon, in part with the goal of beating the Soviet Union in the space race. At the height of the Cold War, competition with the U.S.S.R. provided an organizing principle for U.S. efforts in space, and a remarkable amount of government resources were brought to bear in the effort. At its peak in the mid-1960s, $7 out of every $1,000 of national income was spent by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


Editor’s Note:


The Conversation

Two NASA astronauts, Robert Behnken and Douglas Hurley, have finally made history by travelling to the International Space Station in a privately funded spacecraft, SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket and Crew Dragon capsule.


Editor’s Note:


Some things are in fact, rocket science. Luckily there are rocket scientists who can help explain everything. Here Gareth Dorrian and Ian Whittaker break it down for a lay audience.

New York Times

Two American astronauts lifted off at 3:22 p.m. from a familiar setting, the same Florida launch pad that once served Apollo missions and the space shuttles. But the rocket and capsule that lofted them out of the atmosphere were a new sight for many — built and operated not by NASA but by SpaceX, the company founded by billionaire Elon Musk to pursue his dream of sending colonists to Mars.


Editor’s Note:


Business Insider

“I heard the explosion before it showed up on the LabPadre camera. I heard all of my windows rattle, and then I heard something hit the house on the roof, like a big thud,” Johnson told Business Insider. “It was a very loud boom. It’s left me feeling stressed and a little deafened.”


Editor’s Note:


Popular Mechanics

If we want to go to the Moon, Mars, and beyond, we’ve got to jump this hurdle first.


Editor’s Note:


Medium

Everyone has a dream. Dreams light the fires in our lives — fires that give us purpose, passion, and drive. These passions shape our lives and our outlooks on life.


Editor’s Note:


Financial Express

The success of manned mission into Earth’s orbit is seen as the beginning of affordable Space programme to Moon and further putting the Mars mission within human travel grasp.


Editor’s Note:


Florida Today

BREVARD COUNTY – On Wednesday, SpaceX, Elon Musk’s nearly 20-year-old company, is slated to fulfill its most important mission to date.


Editor’s Note:


This weekend’s launch was a moment not just for SpaceX and the U.S., but also for Elon Musk. Here Emre Kelly looks back at how the controversial billionaire got to this point.

AFP

A decade of cooperation between the U.S. and Russia to send astronauts into space could be ending.


Editor’s Note:


Associated Press

It’s back to the future as NASA astronauts launch again from the U.S. — aboard a retro-style “Right Stuff” capsule.


Editor’s Note:


Fortune

“We have begun an exciting new chapter where NASA can now focus on deep space,” says Stanford professor Scott Hubbard, the former director of NASA’s Ames Research Center who also helped advise SpaceX on crew safety. “The more routine up and down to low Earth orbit can be purchased a bit like an airline ticket.”


Editor’s Note:


The Atlantic

For nearly a decade, if Americans wanted to leave the planet, they had to do so from a launchpad in Kazakhstan. Now they need only go as far as Florida.


Editor’s Note:


TIME

You never know what you’ve got til it’s gone. And if you don’t believe that, consider the national jubilation at 3:22 PM EDT Saturday afternoon, when an American rocket carrying an American crew lifted off from American soil for the first time since 2011, carrying astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken to the International Space Station (ISS). The successful launch comes just a few days after Wednesday’s initial attempt was scrubbed due to weather.


Editor’s Note:


The Atlantic

These days, the women married to NASA’s space travelers are astronauts themselves.


Editor’s Note:


Reuters

Elon Musk’s SpaceX said on Tuesday that it raised $346.2 million in a new round of funding, a day before it launches two American astronauts to the International Space Station.


Editor’s Note:


The Hill

The Department of the Air Force’s decision to delay the creation of the Space Force Reserve and Space National Guard (the Space Reserve Components) until 2022 at the earliest hasn’t merely showcased its disdain for the 3,000 part-time space professionals by orphaning them in the Air Force. It also has virtually ensured that there will be no “Doolittles” for space.


Editor’s Note:


Vox

Using $100 million of his PayPal payout, Musk founded SpaceX back in 2002, predating his Tesla car company by more than a year. As the story goes, Musk wanted to put plants on Mars, but it was too expensive to acquire the rockets to do so. So he started his own company, SpaceX, to see if he couldn’t get those costs down. In early years, the venture seemed destined for failure: Between 2006 and 2008, the first three launches of its privately funded Falcon 1 rocket failed. But the fourth SpaceX rocket succeeded later in 2008, and the fifth carried a satellite into orbit in 2009.


Editor’s Note:


Arizona State University

It’s 2040. You are on the first team to settle on Mars. You live in a habitat that has been designed by the finest minds on Earth. Keeping you all alive is a physicochemical system that produces oxygen, scrubs carbon dioxide and trace contaminants, and regulates pressure. There is also a biological life support system with a full vegetable garden.


Editor’s Note:


Discover Magazine

The pilot of the final flight of the Space Shuttle Discovery previews what the Crew Dragon launch means for the future of space exploration.


Editor’s Note:



($) = This source has a hard paywall. You will need to suscribe to view this article.