#21
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  • Gardens of the galaxy (#1)
  • Chinese private firms (#9)
  • Interstellar Oumuamua (#3)
  • SpaceX and sea turtles (#20)


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The Guardian

With a mission to Mars on the horizon and astronauts spending longer than ever in orbit, scientists are looking for ways to grow vegetables in space.


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The Verge

With the success of SpaceX’s Crew Dragon launch this weekend, NASA now has the capability to launch its own astronauts from the US once again — and that means changes are in store for the future of the International Space Station.


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Universe Today

When Canadian astronomer Robert Weryk discovered ‘Oumuamua passing through our Solar System with the Pan-STARRS telescope, in October 2017, it caused quite a stir. It was the first interstellar object we’d ever seen coming through our neighbourhood. The excitement led to speculation: what could it be?


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A couple of years ago, the first ever interstellar object Oumuamua created a lot of buzz in the media. Here, Evan Gough reports about a new study that has dissected the components of the mysterious object.

Click Orlando

NASA astronauts Doug Hurley, Bob Behnken arrived at ISS Sunday after launching from Kennedy Space Center.


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The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — It was one small step for man, one giant leap for capitalism.


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Max Planck Institute

Among the more than 4,000 known exoplanets, KOI-456.04 is something special: less than twice the size of Earth, it orbits a sun-like star. And it does so with a star-planet distance that could permit planetary surface temperatures conducive to life. The object was discovered by a team led by the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research in Göttingen.


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NASA

New results from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope suggest the formation of the first stars and galaxies in the early universe took place sooner than previously thought. A European team of astronomers have found no evidence of the first generation of stars, known as Population III stars, as far back as when the universe was just 500 million years old.


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Ohio State University

The halo that surrounds our own Milky Way galaxy is much hotter than scientists once believed – and it may not be unique among galaxies.


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Space News

HELSINKI — A number of Chinese private launch firms for the burgeoning commercial space sector have reported progress in efforts to develop a range of launch vehicles.


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We read a lot about satellite launches and space missions led by the Chinese government, but not a lot is reported about the private sector players in the country. Andrew Jones tries to change this by digging into the details about a number of private Chinese firms.

Universe Today

Mars only has two moons: Phobos and Deimos. They’re strange, for moons, little more than lumpy, potato-shaped chunks of rock. They’re much too small for self-gravitation to have made them round. And one of them, Deimos, has an unusually tilted orbit.


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Business Insider

Psychologists say the effect isn’t just a matter of idle curiosity, but perhaps an essential part of maintaining mental health on long-duration space missions.


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Yellowhammer News

Two intrepid explorers from The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), Matt Turner, who holds a doctorate in Mechanical Engineering, and Aerospace Engineering graduate Kaitlin Russell, visited an extraordinary place last summer to perform experiments for a research team participating in a docu-series called “The Secret of Skinwalker Ranch.”


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Forbes

When astronomers first launched telescopes into space for a better view of the cosmos, they started relatively small; the idea was to make sure the technology worked before investing time and money in the much bigger space telescopes astronomers like Nancy Grace Roman and Lyman Spitzer were already dreaming of.


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Observer.com

The promise of commercial spaceflight—trips into Earth-orbit, or vacations to the Moon—have long been a hallmark of what a successful future should look like. Yet, despite the best efforts of many private companies, these commercial capabilities have never quite materialized.


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Daily Maverick

Back in 1957, the Soviet Union launched Sputnik 1, the first unmanned man-made satellite, into space. They followed it up four years later by sending Lieutenant Yuri Gagarin aboard the Vostok 1, making history as the first nation to send a human into space, and to orbit Earth.


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CNN

When NASA astronaut Dr. Serena Auñón-Chancellor arrived on the International Space Station for her six-month stay in June 2018, she was in awe of the vast array of science experiments on board. Before they launch, astronauts are only trained on about 20% of the science they see on the station.


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The recent launch by SpaceX and NASA is being hailed as a turning point for the space industry. Ashley Strickland writes that the launch could also have a positive impact in terms of boosting science research on the space station.

Associated Press

CAPE CANAVERAL – SpaceX’s debut astronaut launch is the biggest, most visible opening shot yet in NASA’s grand plan for commercializing Earth’s backyard.


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The Print

Right now, private players can only boast of delivering low-cost products and services to ISRO, but it needs to widen its customer base and develop more design capabilities.


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The Washington Post

The Falcon 9 rocket pushed Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken into orbit at 16,000 miles per hour. The pepper pellet that hit Darrell Hampton’s face on Earth was traveling at about 1.4% that speed, fast enough to shatter the back of his cellphone before walloping his eye and showering his neck with an indescribable burning sensation. Up until that point, Hampton had marched peacefully with other Denver protesters Saturday afternoon, at around the same time astronauts Hurley and Behnken were flying toward the International Space Station.


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Border Report

ALAMO – A massive fiery and concussive explosion on Friday at the SpaceX launch facility in South Texas could have caused untold damage to endangered wildlife and the eco-sensitive Gulf of Mexico border region, several environmentalists told Border Report on Monday.


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The Bakersfield Californian

The United States is now back to launching people into orbit from its own soil. Last weekend, a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket with a Crew Dragon on top put NASA astronauts Robert (Bob) Behnken and Douglas (Doug) Hurley into orbit for a docking with the International Space Station several hours later.


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Forbes

When SpaceX became the first private company to carry two people into Earth’s orbit on May 30, and then to the International Space Station the next day, Elon Musk won many fans overnight who until recently dismissed him as a blowhard.


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The Atlantic

Even in the tumultuous Apollo era, the feats of the country’s space program were a momentary diversion, not a national salve.


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USA Today

Though the news is filled with stories of riots and a pandemic, the most transformative things going on at present are in a totally different sphere. One of those things is pretty obvious, the other less so.


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Space.com

SpaceX successfully launched a new batch of 60 Starlink internet satellites into orbit late Wednesday (June 3) and nailed a rocket landing at sea to top off the mission.


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