#3
single distill image banner
  • Space race to accelerate in 2020
  • Blue Origin tests lunar lander
  • Likelihood of disruptive solar storms
  • NASA announces space hotel
Selection and ranking powered by deepnews logo
Story Source
The Conversation
It appears we have missed another close call between two satellites — but how close did we really come to a catastrophic event in space?

Editor’s Note: Contact between satellites in space could be an extremely dangerous proposition. Here Gregory Cohen of Western Sydney University looks at a recent narrow escape.

CNN
Voyager 2 was only expected to last for five years, but it’s still operating 42 years after launch. Yet Saturday, the probe did experience a bit of a hiccup 11 billion miles from Earth, according to NASA. The spacecraft was expected to make a scheduled maneuver and rotate 360 degrees to help calibrate its magnetometer, or magnetic field instrument. This is one of five instruments still operating on the probe

Editor’s Note:

Ars Technica
The Sun is our closest star, and without it life on our world could not survive. So it is essential to understand its nature. And yet, even though the Sun shines brightly on every clear day on Earth, it is difficult for astronomers to observe the star closely for a number of reasons.

Editor’s Note:

The Hill
On January 28, 1986, at 11:39 EST, the space shuttle Challenger lifted off from the Kennedy Space Center. Her crew consisted of six NASA astronauts, Commander Francis R. Scobee, Pilot Michael J. Smith, mission specialists Ronald McNair, Ellison Onizuka, Judith Resnik and Gregory Jarvis, and teacher Christa McAuliffe, who had been chosen to become the first American civilian to go into space.

Editor’s Note:

Tech Crunch
At the FAA’s 23rd Annual Commercial Commercial Space Transportation Conference in Washington, DC on Wednesday, a panel dedicated to the topic of trends in VC around space startups touched on public vs. private funding, the right kinds of space companies that should even be considering venture funding, and, perhaps most notably, the big L: Liquidity.

Editor’s Note:

Spaceflight Now
NASA has selected Axiom Space, a Houston-based startup partnering with Boeing and other aerospace contractors, to attach a commercial habitat to the International Space Station and begin constructing an orbiting complex that the company says could ultimately replace the international research outpost.

Editor’s Note:

Space News
WASHINGTON — Blue Origin will perform tests of the engine it is developing for its Blue Moon lunar lander at a U.S. Air Force Research Lab test site, the two organizations announced Jan. 27.

Editor’s Note:

Space
A two-stage Electron booster is scheduled to lift off from Rocket Lab’s New Zealand launch site during a 4-hour window that opens at 7 p.m. EST (0000 GMT and 1 p.m. local New Zealand time on Jan. 31).

Editor’s Note:

The Conversation
What will space exploration look like in 2069, a century after the first moon landing? In the fifth and final episode of podcast series, To the moon and beyond, we speak to space scientists about the missions they are dreaming about and planning for the future.

Editor’s Note:

AFP
The US plans to step up its space rocket launches in 2020, officials said Wednesday, an increase driven largely by private sector companies like SpaceX.

Editor’s Note: The space race has really come to life in recent years. AFP covers the issue from the Commercial Space Transportation Conference and notes that this growth pattern is likely to continue in 2020.

Earth Sky
A new joint study by the University of Warwick and the British Antarctic Survey used historical data to extend scientists’ previous estimates of the likelihood of space super-storms. These storms may originate with solar flares, seen to erupt explosively on the sun during years of high solar activity.

Editor’s Note:

NASA
Investigations studying tissue culturing, bone loss and phage therapy will be launching, along with more scientific experiments and supplies, to the International Space Station on a Northrop Grumman Cygnus spacecraft. The vehicle launches no earlier than Feb. 9 from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia.

Editor’s Note:

Spaceflight Now
The European-built Solar Orbiter spacecraft was installed on top of its United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 launcher Friday at Cape Canaveral, ready for final charging and checkouts before liftoff Feb. 9 to finally begin a more than $1.5 billion science mission first approved by the European Space Agency nearly 20 years ago.

Editor’s Note:

Space News
WASHINGTON — NASA plans for the first time to allow researchers to fly with their payloads on commercial suborbital vehicles, ending years of debate and deliberation.

Editor’s Note:

National Interest
Boeing quietly has withdrawn from the U.S. military’s effort to develop a reusable spaceplane for cheaply and quickly launching small satellites into low orbit.

Editor’s Note:

Spaceflight Now
Japanese officials halted a countdown Monday at the Tanegashima Space Center when teams overseeing preparations for launch of an H-2A rocket detected a nitrogen gas leak, prompting the return of the launcher and its Japanese government payload to a nearby assembly building for repairs.

Editor’s Note:

Engineering and Technology
The land speed record car has returned to the UK Land Speed Centre, Bloodhound’s HQ in Gloucestershire, after having successfully completed its crucial high-speed tests in South Africa. These tests took place on the Hakskeenpan: a dry lakebed in the Kalahari Desert, during which the land speed record vehicle notched speeds of 628mph (1,010km/h), placing the Bloodhound LSR car, unofficially, as the sixth fastest car of all time.

Editor’s Note:

Gizmodo
A newly proposed House authorization bill would push back NASA’s deadline to land humans on the Moon to 2028 instead of 2024, while also calling for a crewed landing on Mars in 2033. Reactions to this proposal have been mixed, with NASA’s chief Jim Bridenstine unhappy about the way the agency is supposed to roll out this recommended plan.

Editor’s Note:

Circle ID
In a study of the Internet in China in the late 1990s, my colleagues and I observed that “China has been able to execute plans effectively by allocating resources to competing, government-owned enterprises,” and Kai-Fu Lee shows that they have pursued a similar strategy with respect to AI. Now they are doing the same with low-Earth orbit (LEO) broadband satellite constellations.

Editor’s Note: From the outside China’s space efforts can be viewed as a monolith, but here Larry Press of California State University explores the different ventures and their competition with each other.

Space News
WASHINGTON — As OneWeb prepares to begin monthly launches for its broadband constellation next month, the company and a U.S. Senator are pushing the FCC to act on an application filed nearly two years ago for 1,260 more satellites.

Editor’s Note:

ESA
More than 1100 people now work in the space industry at Harwell in Oxfordshire – up 16% over the past 12 months – according to figures released today. Some 105 companies are based on the campus, which is Europe’s most concentrated space cluster. The growth rate is on target to deliver 5000 jobs in 200 organisations by 2030.

Editor’s Note:

Tech Crunch
SpaceX is one step closer to an even more re-usable launch system today, after it successfully recovered one fo the halves of the fairing used on its Starlink satellite launch today. The fairing half was caught by its ‘Ms. Tree’ vessel, a ship at sea in the Atlantic strung with a large net specifically for the purpose of recovering these launch craft components.

Editor’s Note:

The Diplomat
The increasing competition for space-related power and prestige in Asia has echoes of the Cold War space race of the mid-20th century.

Editor’s Note:

CNN
NASA is planning to bring Martian samples back to Earth – and they’re looking for someone to lead the mission. The Mars Sample Return (MSR) program, set to take place over the next decade, aims to collect samples of Martian rock, soil, and atmosphere for analysis and testing on Earth.

Editor’s Note:

TASS
Before the end of 2030, a testing and experimenting facility must be built, and the future nuclear engine must be perfected on the ground, including conducting resource tests

Editor’s Note:

($) = This source has a hard paywall. You will need to suscribe to view this article.