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Spaceflight Now
A commercial Cygnus cargo freighter arrived at the International Space Station Tuesday two-and-a-half days after launching from Virginia’s Eastern Shore, delivering a new British-made high-speed communications antenna and more than 7,000 pounds of other experiments and equipment.

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CNBC
SpaceX will fly four privately-paying space tourists to orbit in its Crew Dragon capsule, the company unveiled on Tuesday.

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The Hill
Last summer it looked as if the long, celebrated career of Bill Gerstenmaier, NASA’s associate administrator in charge of human spaceflight, had reached a somewhat ignominious end.

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The Conversation
Just over a year ago, courtesy of NASA’s New Horizons mission, we were treated to images of 2014MU69, a small object 6.6 billion kilometers from the sun – making it the most distant object to have ever been visited by a spacecraft. It was described, variously, as a snowman, a bowling pin or a peanut. What we were seeing was a picture of one of the oldest and most primitive bodies in the solar system.

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Western Australia Today
Launching rockets is only a small part of a potentially trillion dollar space industry supply chain, with plenty of opportunities and jobs emerging away from the launch pad, WA Science, Innovation and ICT Minister Dave Kelly says.

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Tech Crunch
‘I don’t care about this first launch at all; it doesn’t need to work’

Editor’s Note: A growing number of companies are now entering the space race. Here, Darrell Etherington reviews the antics of the latest entrant, Astra, and its proximity to the capital of tech.

Washington Post
A rocket booster that SpaceX hoped would make its 50th successful landing after launch on Monday missed the autonomous ship in the Atlantic Ocean where it was supposed to come down, the company said during an internet broadcast.

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NPR
The daredevil “Mad” Mike Hughes was killed in a rocket launch gone wrong Saturday in Barstow, Calif., two witnesses to the accident confirmed. He was 64.

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NASA
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, under a grant from the NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts program, is running a public challenge to develop an obstacle avoidance sensor for a possible future Venus rover. The “Exploring Hell: Avoiding Obstacles on a Clockwork Rover” challenge is seeking the public’s designs for a sensor that could be incorporated into the design concept.

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Space News
WASHINGTON — Lockheed Martin says it lost $410 million on the first three commercial satellites built on its new LM2100 platform, including the JCSAT-17 satellite Arianespace launched Feb. 18 on an Ariane 5 rocket.

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Indian Express
The probe, launched on August 12, 2018, completed its fourth close approach — called perihelion — on January 29, whizzing past at about 3.93 lakh km/h, at a distance of only 18.6 million km from the Sun’s surface.

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Ars Technica
SpaceX founder Elon Musk said Thursday the company is “driving hard” toward an orbital flight of the company’s Starship vehicle this year.

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Spaceflight Now
A Japanese-owned communications satellite built in Colorado and a South Korean environmental monitoring observatory shared an Ariane 5 rocket ride into orbit Tuesday from the South American jungle.

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Quartz
Up to four passengers will be able to hire SpaceX’s Dragon spacecraft for a joyride around the Earth, Elon Musk’s company said today.

Editor’s Note: Many of us, particularly Over the Moon readers, probably entertain the notion of someday going to space. Here Quartz delves into how we got to this point and what the limits are.

Tech Crunch
March 2 is the planned launch date for SpaceX’s 20th ISS resupply mission, which is bringing the usual supplies and goodies, plus a payload of interesting experiments from partners and paying customers. And a big expansion to Europe’s Columbus Module.

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TASS
“One of the main crew members is temporarily unfit for the task,” he said

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BBC
“Moon dust” could be a vital source of fuel, building material and even drinking water for astronauts, according to the Open University.

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Tech Crunch
Toronto-based telecommunications startup Kepler Communications surprised many recently when it revealed plans to establish its own satellite assembly and base the operation in its own hometown instead of contracting the work to an existing manufacturer.

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IANS
Chennai: The Indian space agency will carry out a series of tests to validate the design and engineering of the rocket and orbital module system for the country’s prestigious human space flight programme-Gaganyaan, a top official said.

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Engineering & Technology
‘The whole is greater than the sum of its parts’ is certainly true of a robotics start-up hub in Denmark, which is turning some imaginative concepts into commercial products.

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Stanford University
A class of engine now used to keep satellites in stable orbits could be adapted to power long-distance space probes.

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Press Trust of India
NEW DELHI: India and the US are eyeing to sign around five pacts providing for cooperation in areas of intellectual property rights, trade facilitation and homeland security during President Donald Trump’s maiden visit to India next week, the external affairs ministry said on Thursday.

Editor’s Note: As frequent readers of Over the Moon will know, India is an emerging player in the space race. Here space gets a mention as part of an overall look at Trump’s visit to India.

JAXA (Japan)
This week (19 February 2020), the MMX mission transitioned to become a JAXA Project: an official step in mission development authorised by the Japanese government. The mission was previously in the Pre-Project phase, where the focus was on research and analysis, such as simulating landings to improve spacecraft design. The focus will now move onto the development of mission hardware and software.

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AP
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — In 1959, Ronald Erwin McNair walked into a South Carolina library. The 9-year-old aspiring astronaut wanted to check out a calculus book, but a librarian threatened to call the police if he didn’t leave. McNair was black.

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The Conversation
The 2018 movie A.I. Rising explores how machines could fulfill desires and support humans during space travel. Lo and behold, it might contain the solution to problems related to space exploration.

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