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  • Geofence warrants (#2)
  • Advancing Blockchain Act (#19)
  • #BanTikTok (#10)
  • Amazon sued over COVID (#23)


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Center for Responsive Politics

In response to Hawley’s bill, Twitter took to Capitol Hill. Four lobbying disclosures reveal Twitter’s lobbyists discussed the bill with lawmakers between April 2019 and March 2020, costing the company around $240,000. Twitter is also a member of Netchoice, a group that represents, among others, Facebook, Google and TikTok. Those companies also lobbied against Hawley’s bill.


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CNet

Rather than seeking warrants for a person backed up with probable cause, police have begun relying on geofence warrants that sweep up information on any device that happened to be in the vicinity of a crime.


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For years authorities and tech have negotiated how exactly the latter would cooperate in law enforcement investigations in terms of warrants and court orders. Here Alfred Ng of CNet looks at a specific type of warrant that has seen a massive increase.

Mashable

When it comes to passionate love affairs, the one between Donald Trump and Twitter lasted quite a while. But as these things often go, the years have worn heavily on the once white-hot relationship.


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Vox EU

There is a developed public discourse on the need for more enforcement, regulation and legislation of digital platforms. Regulating ‘gatekeeper platforms’ has emerged as a major plank of the new European Commission mandate, with a consultation process underway this week for a plan to introduce both ex-ante regulation and a new market investigation tool with quasi-regulatory powers. This column asks how economists can contribute to rationally progressing the debate, so that it is not based on subjective priors, but uses applied theory to make testable predictions, and data to discriminate between theories.


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Caixin

China’s national legislature last week approved the nation’s first civil code, completing a decades-long effort to enact comprehensive legislation defining the rights and duties of its 1.4 billion citizens.


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Associated Press

France is rolling out an official coronavirus contact-tracing app aimed at containing fresh outbreaks as lockdown restrictions gradually ease, becoming the first major European country to deploy the smartphone technology amid simmering debates over data privacy.


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Tech Node

China’s tightened privacy regime leaves a crucial element up to interpretation.


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The Canary

It can often feel as if digital technology giants like Google and Facebook get a completely free pass from governments around the world. In particular, their role in decimating the increasingly beleaguered media industry has largely gone unchallenged by governing parties of both the right and the left. But now, two nations on opposite sides of the globe have finally taken an important first step in addressing this problem.


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CPO Magazine

The past ten years brought with them a seemingly never-ending array of data intensive and increasingly “intelligent” technologies. While data security and privacy remain paramount, an increasingly data-intensive technological, economic, and social landscape will mean that the ownership and control of data will become increasingly important and likely oft-contested. It is here that the worlds of data privacy, security, and protection collide with the world of intellectual property. This is a trend we can expect to grow in the decade ahead, as data intensive technologies like artificial intelligence (“AI”), blockchain, and the Internet of Things (“IoT”) and the Cloud continue to break new ground, altering the legal and security landscape in the process.


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Asian Age

There is an inherent bias against Tiktok because it is Chinese. There are suspicions that TikTok’s parent ByteDance is connected to the Communist Party. There is also the data sovereignty argument, where Indian data is shared with Chinese companies.


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Tech Dirt

The Center for Democracy and Technology appears to be the first out of the gate in suing Donald Trump to block his silly executive order on Section 230. In the aftermath of the EO being issued I know some people wondered if it was actually worth suing over, since it actually did so little in practice. But, as I discussed in this week’s podcast, it can still be used to create havoc.


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Economic Times (Times of India)

NEW DELHI: US President Donald Trump’s executive order diluting the immunity enjoyed by social media companies is unlikely to change India’s stand on making firms such as Twitter and Facebook more responsible and accountable for content posted on their platforms.


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Part of regulation is that governments can of course compare what they are doing with other countries, cities, states, etc. Here Surabhi Agarwal writes for ET on issues such as Section 79(2) of the IT Act.

Channel News Asia

SINGAPORE: Prior to COVID-19, few would have imagined that at least 80 per cent of Singapore’s working population, if not more, need not physically be at the office to do their jobs.


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RAND

The outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in an unprecedented public health crisis, presenting new and profound challenges on multiple fronts around the world. Throughout this period, the response from science, technology, and innovation communities has been remarkable, proving that innovation and learning, interdisciplinary methods and collaboration, information and data sharing, and adaptability are more important than ever.


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Nikkei Asian Review

TOKYO — India’s struggle against the coronavirus pandemic has not stopped a dealmaking whirlwind at Reliance Industries. As the country has slowed down, its biggest corporation by sales and market capitalization has only seemed to speed up.


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Los Angeles Times

WASHINGTON — Nobody seems happy with Twitter these days — or Facebook or any other social media platform, for that matter.


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The News (Pakistan)

The disaster that has descended on the world in the form of Covid-19 has shaken global economies. Many economic giants including the US, China, Germany, UK, Japan, France and Italy are struggling to cope.


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South China Morning Post

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said the deal “bolsters US national security at a time when China is trying to dominate cutting-edge tech and control critical industries”.


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NextGov

Rep. Brett Guthrie, R-Ky., recently introduced legislation that would mandate an exhaustive federal government-led examination of the adoption and impacts of blockchain in the U.S. and abroad.


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The Drum

The Drum Network is a paid-for membership product which allows agencies to share their news, opinion and insights with The Drum’s audience. Find out more on The Drum Network homepage.


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The Atlantic

The new executive order targeting social-media companies isn’t really about Twitter. It’s about Mark Zuckerberg.


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Regulation is about the law, which applies to all equally, but can sometimes take a personal twist. Here Zeynep Tufekci argues that Trump’s executive order was particularly aimed at Mark Zuckerberg.

C Tech

Within today’s food supply system, slaughterhouses are particularly dangerous and unhealthy environments that often employ minority and undocumented workers who do not know their rights or are too afraid of possible reprisals to exercise them. It is these abattoirs that are one of the food supply chain’s weakest links, as they are especially vulnerable to disruptions during crises like the current pandemic.


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Mashable

Amazon.com has been sued by a total of six people connected to Amazon Fulfillment centre located at New York’s Staten Island. The lawsuit has been filed over allegations that the e-commerce giant has failed to comply with New York law and state and federal public health guidance during the Coronavirus pandemic.


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Tech Dirt

As Facebook employees stage a digital walk-out and make their thoughts known about the social media giant’s choice to not intervene in any way on “political posts”, especially those of President Donald Trump, some have called for the newly-created Oversight Board to step up and force a change in Facebook. While the official answer is that they can’t start (because supposedly they haven’t given out laptops yet), the real and very simple reason why the Facebook Oversight Board won’t get involved is because it can’t. It’s not created to function that way, it’s not staffed for something like this, and ultimately, due to its relationship with Facebook, anything it would say on this matter right now would be taken in an advisory capacity at best. Facebook, understandably not wanting to actually give any of its power away, played confidence games with the idea of external, independent oversight, and it’s clear that they fooled a lot of people. Let me explain.


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Tech Crunch

The European Commission is asking for views on how online platforms should be regulated in future, launching a public consultation today on the forthcoming Digital Services Act (DSA).


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