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  • Telemedicine and law
  • EU and mobile data
  • When all this is over
  • The new content moderation


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The Hill

With hundreds of millions of people staying at home over the next few weeks, attempting to minimize the spread of the coronavirus, it may be a good time to avoid seeing a doctor or visiting a medical clinic for run-of-the-mill illnesses. The medical services in our respective countries need to be focused on those people suffering with symptoms of the virus. While we are homebound, we will need to reconsider many of the services that we traditionally have done in professional settings and that we can do in the comfort of our own homes. Welcome to the next level of telemedicine.


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MIT Technology Review

The crisis has governments and companies scrambling to decide when it’s appropriate to lift data privacy protections and AI ethics guidelines.


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Jacobin

The corporate architects of this consumption regime have intensified their political activities to reinforce the system. Lobbying by the communications and electronics sector has outpaced even energy and natural resources industries since the late 1990s. Google spent nearly $22 million on lobbying, and Amazon made almost $14 million in federal campaign contributions in 2018 alone. Capital’s leverage over sociopolitical communication and cultural horizons presents big obstacles to questioning destructive consumption, let alone imagining, discussing, and planning an ecologically sane, socially just future.


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Financial Times ($)

2020 was supposed to see landmark regulations of Big Tech


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Lawfare

The coronavirus pandemic has forced people around the world to reexamine many things that are usually taken for granted. On that list is social media content moderation—the practice of social media platforms making and enforcing the rules about what content is or is not allowed on their services.


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The COVID crisis has sparked major changes in the way that tech platforms are dealing with the information posted by users on their sites. Here Evelyn Douek writes for Lawfare writes about what is happening and what it means for the future.

OC Register

In the past few years, the attitude toward tech has increasingly soured. Multiple data privacy and election-related scandals at various tech companies and a new political strategy of being tough on “Big Tech” have led to the phenomenon known as “techlash.”


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Bloomberg

Where Europe leads, others follow — at least when it comes to the rules of commerce. Why? Because the alternative could be too costly. Companies selling into multiple markets want a one-size-fits-all approach to regulation and products, perhaps even more so in a world grappling with the Coronavirus, and that is effectively giving the European Union an edge in setting standards far beyond its borders. Even Brexit-bound Britain and trailblazing California are feeling the Brussels Effect.


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Euractiv

The European Commission has begun taking more decisive steps toward secure, encrypted communications. But while all of these steps may be positive, not all of them are identical.


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Economic Times

Without any protocol for resolving conflicting views between regulators on the same issue, stakeholders such as the parties involved in disputes, as well as consumers, at large suffer. Moreover, the regulatory burden for entities involved to supply information, litigate at multiple fora, etc, adding to the cost and (un)ease of doing business.


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Lexology

On 19 February 2020 the European Commission released a white paper on Artificial Intelligence (AI) which sets out the approach the Commission proposes to take as this new technology evolves. This provides an opportunity to reflect on the approach which may be taken in New Zealand and other jurisdictions.


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VoA News

Not everyone who wanted to buy the bank cards stolen from Southeast Asian owners would pay the same price: The higher the amount of money left on the card, the higher the price. That’s according to Technisanct, a cybersecurity company based in India, which said it found the data for hundreds of thousands of cards for sale online, taken from citizens in the six largest nations in Southeast Asia.


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Tech Radar

How do businesses remain data compliant and secure with staff working remotely?


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POLITICO

PARIS — Only a few weeks ago, policymakers in Brussels, Washington, Paris and Berlin were spending a lot of energy trying to police Big Tech.


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Several articles on this list deal with the EU, a leader in tech regulation now also dealing across the union with COVID. Here POLITICO reports from Paris about a “truce” between regulators and Big Tech.

Verdict.co.uk

As of March 21, New York State has passed new, more stringent data privacy regulations, in the form of the Stop Hacks and Improve Electronic Data Security Act, otherwise known as the SHIELD act.


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CPO Magazine

The EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) has very strict conditions regarding the collection and handling of sensitive health data; these terms remain in effect even as Europe adopts extreme measures to combat the coronavirus (Covid-19) outbreak. As various organizations attempt to track the spread of the virus for the sake of public health, they face the added challenge of keeping within the bounds of regulations that are tight even in an emergency situation.


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IT News

The Australian Taxation Office is building a network analytics solution called ‘ANGIE’ to help its tax avoidance taskforce discern complex, multi-layered relationships between clients.


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Reuters

WARSAW/BERLIN — Governments across Europe are turning to technology to track the spread of the coronavirus and monitor people under quarantine, an approach that seeks to learn from Asia but is also putting the region’s privacy rules to the test.


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Irish Times

When an image circulated on Twitter last week showing colour-coded data from more than a million smart thermometers plotted to a map of the United States, it created a sensation.


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Tech Crunch

Watchdogs have started to raise the issue that new working practices and online activity necessitated by the spread of the coronavirus pandemic are creating new sets of privacy, security and data protection challenges. Today a startup is announcing a growth round of funding to help online businesses navigate those issues better.


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Venture Beat

The proposed federal legislation, dubbed the EARN IT Act (short for Eliminating Abusive and Rampant Neglect of Interactive Technologies), creates incentives for companies to “earn” their liability protection for laws that take place on their platform, particularly related to online child sexual abuse. Civil libertarians have condemned it as a way to circumvent encryption and an attempt to scan all messages.


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NBC News

Facing the prospect that hoaxes or misinformation could worsen a global pandemic, tech platforms are taking control of the information ecosystem like never before.


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Bloomberg Law

The European Union’s powerful data protection rules don’t stand in the way of the fight against the new coronavirus but nations should still tread carefully to avoid trampling on citizens’ privacy rights, a panel of EU regulators signaled on Friday.


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Abacus News

Until recently, Xiang Bao never had any reason to try out Telegram. The app, known for its secure messaging features, is blocked in China. But Xiang decided to give Telegram a try while looking for information on a new coronavirus spreading through the country ahead of the Lunar New Year holiday in January.


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The coronavirus crisis has highlighted not just data privacy, but also censorship around discussion of the virus. Here Xinmei Shen reports for Abacus about the details of WeChat versus Telegram.

Verdict.co.uk

With the two year anniversary of open banking regulations in January, and the steady rollout of PSD2 rules, the world of banking is facing significant disruption as consumers demand increasingly sophisticated digital products.


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Law.com

A discussion on how to protect legal information stored in cloud solutions. Inquiries address the most pressing concerns related to cloud storage and provide guidance for both current and future solutions used by law firms and businesses in general.


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