#3
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  • Marriott breach (#4)
  • Europe’s coronavirus app (#17)
  • Zoom lawsuit (#8)
  • New tax in Indonesia (#22)


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Financial Times ($)

On a cool day late last September, half a dozen Chinese engineers walked into a conference room in the heart of Geneva’s UN district with a radical idea. They had one hour to persuade delegates from more than 40 countries of their vision: an alternative form of the internet, to replace the technological architecture that has underpinned the web for half a century.


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Governments’ plans for the Internet include not just more control over data but more control over the Internet itself. Here the Financial Times gives an in-depth look at efforts by China and the “New IP”

Foreign Policy ($)

Governments around the world are banning fake news about the crisis — and cracking down on their critics while they’re at it.


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Express Computer

Today, to grow with confidence and give a boost to their new initiatives, businesses need a strong data management and protection mechanism. That data protection will take precedence is illustrated by the fact that most companies are adopting new operational strategies such as remote working, implementing new technology like IoT, and shifting to cloud. Given the gamut of data generated this may appear as a challenge, but backup teams now have a rare opportunity to simplify protection, connect with the business, and deliver more value than ever with the use of new technology. Looking at some key emerging trends, we can easily say that the evolving data landscape needs a modern approach to data protection.


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Deccan Herald

Individual names and phone numbers have not been shared but an address is enough to enable targeting of those on the list


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Tech Republic

People have taken actions to better protect their information but feel they need to do more, according to a survey from NortonLifeLock.


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WSJ ($)

Marriott International Inc. is investigating a data breach that exposed up to 5.2 million customers’ personal information, at least the third cyber incident for the hotel giant in the past 18 months.


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Business Live

What the data collection rules would be if the Protection of Personal Information Act were fully in force


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Vice

The lawsuit comes after Motherboard analyzed the Zoom iOS app and found it sent analytic data to Facebook once opened.


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Pymnts

While the advancement of open banking regulations may be seeing a small skip due to the spread of the coronavirus, many countries saw business and typical banking operations halted right after deciding upon new online privacy rules.


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Tech Dirt

When I write about this new lawsuit, filed on behalf of “retired MMA fighter” Nick Catone, against Facebook for removing his account over his anti-vaccine posts, you may expect that it was filed pro se. However, somewhat shockingly, there’s an actual lawyer, James Mermigis, who filed this dumpster fire of an awful complaint.


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Irish Times

As the HSE prepares a coronavirus contact tracing app for voluntary download in the next 10 days, the Irish public should expect to have numerous questions clearly answered before placing it on their own phones.


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WSJ ($)

HONG KONG—The chairman of Huawei Technologies Co. warned the U.S. to expect countermeasures from the Chinese government if it further restricts the technology giant’s access to suppliers, as the company’s profit last year grew at the slowest pace in three years.


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Protocol

As coronavirus spread around the world in February, Google decided to ban most nongovernmental advertising about the outbreak in an effort to defeat misinformation, fraud and scams. But Democrats say the Google ban does something else: It allows the Trump administration to run ads promoting its response to the crisis while denying Democrats the chance to run ads criticizing it.


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Another big interplay between tech and government is elections, particularly advertising. Here Protocol looks at complaints about it given the current situation’s political implications.

Christian Science Monitor

Fionnuala D. Ní Aoláin, a United Nations special rapporteur for human rights, says emergency powers, once enacted, are rarely rolled back. “Even if they are created on the basis of being temporary aberrations, they essentially become permanent additions to the legal architecture of the state,” she warns.


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Adweek ($)

Facebook is adding new types of data to its Download Your Information tool and Instagram equivalent Download Your Data.


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Reuters

DUBLIN – Ireland’s government is to roll out a voluntary phone-tracking app to alert users if someone they have been in contact with develops COVID-19, its health service said on Sunday, two weeks before the pandemic is expected to peak in the country.


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POLITICO

BERLIN — European researchers think they have found a way to use mobile phones to contain the spread of coronavirus — and help people avoid infection — without sacrificing the region’s high standards on privacy.


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Ars Technica

Android API lets apps collect a list of all other installed apps, no permission needed.


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Financial Times ($)

Social media companies have launched a concerted effort to block misinformation during the coronavirus crisis, opening a new front in their battle to stop a clampdown on their activity by EU regulators.


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Forbes

The world is digitising at breakneck speed. We are ever more connected on a daily basis and share increasing amounts of data on ourselves as we go about our lives. When we looked at proptech megatrends in my last column, data privacy was rightly pinpointed as a primary concern for each trend examined


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Daily Dot

It’s no secret that SESTA-FOSTA devastated sex workers across the internet. But why do sex work advocates say the EARN IT Act is so dangerous? The Daily Dot sat down with Hacking//Hustling to understand why the organization is encouraging sex workers, LGBTQ community members, left-leaning activists, and other marginalized groups to fight the bill.


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Jakarta Post

The Indonesian government has officially assumed the authority to tax digital companies operating in the country following the issuance of a new government regulation in lieu of law (Perppu) on Tuesday.


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While much of this Distill focuses on legislation or regulation coming out of North America or Europe, this piece covers actions taken in Indonesia, where lawmakers passed a new tax on digital transactions citing a rise in activity because of COVID.

Business Insider

With Google announcing plans to phase out third-party cookies in Chrome, the implication is wider GDPR and the more recent California act, have brought consumer consent to the forefront of data collection.


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CPO Magazine

The cybersecurity landscape has changed greatly in recent years and continues to be a very fluid situation, forcing governments all over the world to reassess policies. The United States has been at work on this for the past year, and the Cyberspace Solarium Commission has published a 182-page report that makes broad and very significant changes. Some of these changes are things that you would expect; some are very much not.


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ReadWrite

In the United States, from California all the way to Maine, there have been new laws enacted with regards to cybersecurity, privacy, as well as data security and breaches. But is your business prepared? Here are the new privacy and security laws of the states explained and how to get your business ready.


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