#4
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  • Decentralized in Europe (#4)
  • Facebook and DIY masks (#22)
  • Zoom’s last several weeks (#10)
  • The breakable lock gets fined (#25)


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The Atlantic

Amazon’s self-publishing arm gives extremists and neo-Nazis banned from other platforms unprecedented access to a mass audience.


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Part of regulation or potential regulation of tech companies is not just the way they treat data but the way they treat content, and what content they allow. Here a team from the Atlantic digs into self-publishing on Amazon.

Express Computer

To ensure the safety of citizens by tracking movements in an effort to contain the virus and flatten the curve, the definition of privacy seems to have changed at a time like this.


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Security Boulevard

Back in 2018 with the implementation of GDPR, global retailers with business in the EU faced great pressure to be compliant. This year, the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), another tough and impactful data privacy regulation from the U.S., will come into play. Global retailers need to understand its implications and be better prepared this time.


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Tech Crunch

A group of European privacy experts has proposed a decentralized system for Bluetooth-based COVID-19 contacts tracing which they argue offers greater protection against abuse and misuse of people’s data than apps which pull data into centralized pots.


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Global Banking and Finance

From mobile payments to blockchain management, technology is reshaping the world of finance. In particular, cloud computing has had an irrevocable impact on the entire financial services industry. Emerging challenger banks, such as Starling and Monzo, are achieving phenomenal success by building nimble businesses around cloud technology. These banks exist solely through apps and deliver their customers with real-time access to their payment history, unlike most high-street banks which take days to process card payments.


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CNN

The Trump administration wants to use Americans’ smartphone location data to help track and combat the spread of coronavirus. Now, a pair of US data companies are making a public pitch to show just how that kind of technology might work.


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Stuff NZ

A long pregnancy struggle and the gut-wrenching loss of two babies had left Cecilia and James Robinson devastated.


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Quartz

South Africa’s government has to had to assure citizens it won’t spy on them after news that it plans to use contact tracing as part of the Covid-19 management strategy.


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Electronic Frontier Foundation

As governments, the private sector, NGOs, and others mobilize to fight the COVID-19 pandemic, we’ve seen calls to use location information — typically drawn from GPS and cell tower data — to inform public health efforts.


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CNet

Here’s a timeline of Zoom’s rapid rise and the security problems that have come to light.


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Those following the Deepnews Digest are pretty well caught up on Zoom, though there is always more happening. Here CNet breaks it all down by date as the last several weeks have whooshed on by.

European Council on Foreign Relations

The US and the EU could move beyond their persistent regulatory and technological disputes to establish a common position on the digital space. Over the past five years, the European Union has led the charge on digital regulation, enforcing digital taxes, raising privacy standards, and levying landmark antitrust fines. The bloc has also shaped the debate on pressing issues such as ethical artificial intelligence, the regulation of social media platforms, and the reduction of online harms such as disinformation.


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Crikey

The Ruby Princess is Australia’s single-biggest source of coronavirus infections. Inq examines the rules that allowed it to dock in Sydney.


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Bloomberg

Margrethe Vestager, once Silicon Valley’s top foe, may turn into its best ally by pushing for the tighter oversight that Big Tech says it needs to be saved from itself.


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VentureBeat

It’s census time in the US once again and multiple ads are running on both online and offline media to encourage everyone selected for the census to respond. The constitutional goal of the census is to ensure that congressional districts are properly balanced, thereby ensuring adequate representation. The modern census has expanded beyond that simple goal to allow for how Federal resources will be allocated within each district. Since the census collects significant sensitive data on citizens, it is by definition intended to be anonymous.


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CircleID

As widely reported, and not surprising, the internet is swimming in COVID-19 online scams. Criminals, accustomed to rapidly grabbing online territory during times of crisis and profiting from public fear, are working overtime in the face of the coronavirus. Unfortunately, ICANN’s failure to enforce its minimal WHOIS and DNS abuse requirements has resulted in delayed mitigation efforts at a time when swift responses are needed to protect the public from COVID-19 scams.


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POLITICO

Call for common EU approach comes amid proliferation of country-specific apps.


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CPO Magazine

In the wake of increased and intensified data breaches, legislators are moving to protect their constituents. On June 28, 2018, California passed the most comprehensive consumer privacy law in the United States today, the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (CCPA). The law went into effect January 1 of 2020 and anticipated enforceability is July 1 of this year. It has similarities to the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which became effective on May 25, 2018 and expanded a prior set of guidelines and directives granting individuals certain rights with respect to their personal data. Of note, six states began pursuing comparable legislation in 2019 and several other states are already pursuing a variety of tangential legislation. It is likely that CCPA will further demand for a federal privacy act.


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FiveThirtyEight

The battle against COVID-19 has laid bare the limitations of modern technology in the face of a pandemic. We can’t accurately track the disease’s toll in real time, nor can we accurately predict where it’s headed. We are told that developing a vaccine will take 18 months — which seems excruciatingly slow — and that the only truly effective weapon we have for now is widespread social distancing, which, of course, has its own painful economic side effects. We always believed our modern tools would protect us from catastrophe, but they have proven startlingly inadequate against this invisible enemy.


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Bloomberg

Amazon’s self-publishing arm gives extremists and neo-Nazis banned from other platforms unprecedented access to a mass audience.


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American Prospect

The history of the modern democratic state can be understood as a story of shifting authority and lawmaking, first from private potentates to sovereign monarchs, and then to publicly accountable democracies. Today, this centuries-long democratizing trend is rapidly being reversed. Western democracies are not simply embracing neoliberalism in the sense of deregulating the economy. Elites are pursuing something aptly described as a new form of feudalism, in which entire realms of public law, public property, due process, and citizen rights revert to unaccountable control by private business.


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Security Boulevard

Once mainly a topic for math geeks and techies, encryption is now widely recognized as the technology that protects your information from exposure if it’s captured in a data breach, or conversely blocks your access to it if you fall victim to a ransomware attack. It’s a fundamental part of an enterprise access control strategy, and the last line of defense when other protections break down, yet many organizations struggle with its fundamentals.


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The New York Times

SAN FRANCISCO: As health workers on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic plead for personal protective equipment, volunteer efforts to create hand-sewn masks and deliver them to medical professionals have quickly sprung up across the internet. But those efforts were hampered by Facebook’s automated content moderation systems over the past week, according to sewing organisers who have used the social network to coordinate donation campaigns.


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Speaking of content moderation, there is always the question of whether it is done by robots or people. Here the Times looks at one of the ways that it is difficult to automate who gets thrown in “Facebook jail.”

Tech Republic

The hotly debated move does little to address underlying issues many teachers and parents are having with the platform and other tools, educators say.


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Federal Computer Week

The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency is preparing to release an update to its Trusted Internet Connection program that will focus on the recent surge in telework among federal employees, FCW has confirmed.


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The Register

And you can still open its improved version with a strong magnet


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