#5
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  • IoT and sports (#2)
  • Hackers in India (#11)
  • Questions about extremism (#7)
  • Liechtenstein’s bracelets (#19)


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WIRED

Early in the evening on March 19, the prominent Silicon Valley investor and serial entrepreneur Balaji Srinivasan kicked off a tweet storm with a techno-libertarian call to arms:


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Lexology

As the NFL and other sports leagues contemplate how to resume operations in the face of the COVID-19 crisis, the availability of data has taken heightened importance as teams conduct activities such as free agency. The Internet of Things (IoT) already has overtaken the sports world, where most professional teams, and many other athletes, rely on wearables and other wireless devices to track athletes’ movements, training, and game day performance. These provide for useful techniques to prevent injuries, improve athletic performance, and even select athletes for teams. Meanwhile, stadiums are using IoT to develop “smart stadiums” of the future, designed to enhance the fan experience, increase fan engagement, and also improve security.


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Slate

In March 2018, a driverless car struck and killed a pedestrian in Tempe, Arizona. Following the public outcry after that incident, the developers of driverless cars walked back expectations that these vehicles would soon be sold to the public, accepting that they were not yet “safe enough.” Yet while automating driving stirs up concern, few people seem worried about similar pushes to automate financial services.


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Regulation can either be overarching like GDPR or look at specific areas, in which case there are vast differences in the way we approach one topic versus another. Here Hilary J. Allen writes for Slate about how she thinks something must be done urgently about fintech, particularly given the major players involved.

Electronic Frontier Foundation

In some areas of the United States, local governments are sharing the names and addresses of people who have tested positive for COVID-19 with police and other first responders. This is intended to keep police, EMTs, and firefighters safe should they find themselves headed to a call at the residence of someone who has tested positive for the virus.


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SecurityBoulevard

Every year businesses lose millions of dollars in data breach incidents. A survey by Ponemon Institute revealed a 3% increase in third-party data breaches in 2018, with 59% of companies experiencing a breach due to third parties in 2018. And more than 7.9 billion records were exposed in the first nine months of 2019, which were expected to reach 8.3 billion, and data breaches were up 33.3% over 2018.


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Bloomberg

When Apple Inc. and Google announced they were jointly building tools to help limit the spread of the coronavirus, a debate about the benefits of such technologies and their drawbacks suddenly became much more concrete for users in the U.S. and Europe. Countries in Asia had been turning to technology since the early days of the outbreak, including with some applications that went further in drawing on personal data.


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TIME

Facebook and YouTube designed algorithms to suppress ISIS content. They’re having unexpected side effects.


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STAT News

As money pours into health care startups built around artificial intelligence — more than 350 deals totaling $4 billion in 2019 — the field is generally overlooking the potential litigation risk surrounding the de-identified data exception in HIPAA.


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AP

Potentially dangerous coronavirus misinformation has spread from continent to continent like the pandemic itself, forcing the world’s largest tech companies to take unprecedented action to protect public health.


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Law.com

This article analyzes examples of some of the most recent attempts of cybercrime (either through phishing scams or VPN intrusions), as well as recommendations for how to mitigate risk.


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Deutsche Welle

Hackers in India are taking advantage of a growing digital marketplace, combined with lax regulation, to steal data and sell it on the black market. Experts say regulation is not moving fast enough.


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One of the most interesting systems of personal data and government is in India, with its Aadhaar ID system. Here DW looks at how the growth of data and digital payments carries some risks.

POLITICO

As Europe prepares for the next phase of the coronavirus pandemic, attention has naturally turned to the use of technology. Big data, artificial intelligence and mobile applications may allow us to lift the lockdowns and restart the economy while keeping the virus at bay.


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IT Pro Portal

For all this investment, many businesses could be overlooking a critical area of risk – digital identity silos. Digital identity silos are formed when different departments within a business deliver new digital services independently, creating a separate set of identities for the same customers.


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Federal News Network

The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency rushed out the interim guidance to make teleworking easier for federal employees using cloud services.


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Abacus News

Entering Huawei Technologies’ cybersecurity transparency center in Brussels, visitors could be forgiven for thinking it is a large exhibition facility.


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Global Banking and Finance

Regulation is set to be a key battleground for tomorrow’s innovation


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Balkan Insight

China, Singapore, Israel and Russia are among a number of countries that have developed their own coronavirus mobile tracking apps, mainly using Bluetooth, GPS, cellular location tracking and QR codes. The Chinese government app colour codes citizens according to risk level.


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Financial Times ($)

The principality of Liechtenstein is piloting a programme to fit its citizens with biometric bracelets in a radical new drive to track the emergence of potential cases of Covid-19 in real time.


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Fighting COVID is different when you have only 38,000 citizens. Here the FT looks into a plan to roll out health-tracking bracelets to the entire population of Liechtenstein this fall, with the hopes that intensive tracking of subtle bodily changes will be able to identify cases before symptoms emerge.

Al Monitor

ISTANBUL — As Turkey grapples with the fastest rising number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in the world, two initiatives linked to Ankara’s coronavirus response are raising concern among privacy and free speech advocates.


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Independent (UK)

Technology companies’ generous donations to help tackle the coronavirus represent just 0.2 per cent of the $571bn of profits they have moved into tax havens, research has found.


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CPO Magazine

Companies have experienced a big wake up call due to new data privacy laws, and more work obviously needs to be done.


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Daily Maverick (South Africa)

Planet49, a Hong Kong-based digital marketing company with close associations with Asia Pacific Marketing Limited, targeted South African users with a digital marketing campaign intended to harvest their personal information. The campaign falsely presented a Covid-19 “relief promotion” by local grocery chains. In reality, it enticed WhatsApp users to not only share the promotion with several of their WhatsApp contacts, but also consent to Planet49 selling their personal information to third parties.


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NextGov

Other countries have been using various forms of location and proximity tracing to slow the spread of the disease, with widely varying levels of privacy protections.


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MedCity News

Driven by business interests, many healthcare organizations continue to use the pretext of patient privacy all too easily, to keep data locked away. It’s time to review what this generation of patients really want.


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Venture Beat

At present, most of the U.S. population is being asked to stay home to flatten the curve of the coronavirus pandemic, but as hundreds of millions of people begin to think about how to return to normal life, the need to trace the spread of the disease becomes crucially important.


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