#6
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  • Amazon and its vendors’ data (#2)
  • Indonesia taxing Big Tech (#13)
  • A public Venmo? (#6)
  • Australia code of conduct (#24)


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Story Source
Quartz

Cambridge Analytica is the most famous data company associated with President Trump’s online strategy but, according to former staffers, it was not the most influential. “Their whole personality profile turned out to be complete BS,” Matt Braynard, a former data director for Trump’s 2016 campaign, told Quartz. “But HaystaqDNA, however they did it — whether it was black magic or what — was incredibly effective.”


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WSJ ($)

Contrary to assertions to Congress, employees often consulted sales information on third-party vendors when developing private-label merchandise


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SC Magazine

When wrestling with compliance requirements, CISOs often feel like like they are a performer in the middle of a three-ring circus, rapidly trying to juggle sharp knives. No matter how fast or perfectly they juggle, there is an assistant, or in this case regulator, behind the curtain constantly throwing out more and more knives, each one larger and more deadly. But instead of knives, the real enterprise CISO juggling acts are spheres of compliance.


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Tech Crunch

Leaked images obtained by TechCrunch reveal that Google considered and designed a feature that would let people donate money to websites to help support news publishers, bloggers, and musicians. But Google scrapped the idea and chose not to build out the product, despite these kinds of businesses and creators often struggling to earn revenue.


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OCCRP

The Danish government announced on Saturday that none of its US$58 billion in coronavirus aid would be issued to companies that register in tax havens, pay out dividends, or buy back their own shares.


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MIT Technology Review

The need to distribute emergency government benefits could lead to new, publicly run payment systems.


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Government interactions around payments often pop up in this newsletter, though mostly from the side of regulations on banks, FinTech startups and their different systems. Here Mike Orcutt reports on the potential for a public system that would address concerns about accessibility and privacy.

Geek Wire

The coronavirus crisis quickly became an unexpected life raft for the technology industry’s image as even its biggest critics enlist Big Tech’s help. The scale of large technology companies — seen as a liability just a few months ago — offers unique advantages in a global health crisis and they are buoying the industry’s reputation.


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Daily Nation (Kenya)

I found myself being taken round in circles between the mobile lender, debt collectors and a CRB I had been referred to.


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Gizmodo

Many forms of so-called digital money aren’t actually so new or innovative — nor actual ‘money,’ in most cases — and often have a number of key aspects in common. The ways in which they differ, may be our best indicators for whether this or that payment system or crypto-coin will survive, or simply end up worthless.


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New Statesman

A system built to keep people watching videos has had huge consequences for our society and politics.


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Digital Trends

Imagine if the ground could know if you’re walking on it.


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Tech Dirt

The GDPR is a mess. Still. After nearly two years of existence, it hasn’t done much to improve the privacy of the millions of Europeans it affects. But it has made big tech companies even more dominant and generated a hell of a lot of collateral damage.


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Jakarta Post

Indonesia should turn to value-added tax (VAT) and large tech companies to address the widening shortfall in state revenue, analysts have said. Danny Darussalam Tax Center (DDTC) research partner Bawono Kristiaji said VAT and individual tax were generally more resistant to economic shocks like those that hit Indonesia during the 2008 crisis.


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Something that many governments will be facing in the coming months is budget shortfalls because of COVID-19. Here the Jakarta Post reports on ideas to make some of that money back by targeting Big Tech.

Daily Iowan

Consumer DNA testing received a modest reception from the public when it first became available on the market. Today, aggressive marketing, both online and on television, has propelled its popularity to greater heights. According to the MIT Technology Review, at the beginning of 2019, about 26 million consumers took one of these tests. At this rate, the DNA data kept by testing companies will hold information on at least 100 million people in the next two years.


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Lawfare Blog

On April 17, the Senate Commerce Committee wrapped up one of the body’s first-ever “paper hearings”—a new format adopted in response to the coronavirus crisis, which relied entirely on written questions and answers rather than live testimony. Perhaps appropriately for a hearing conducted in a novel format to prevent the spread of disease, the hearing concerned the role of big data in combating the coronavirus pandemic and the privacy concerns such measures may raise. The hearing featured testimony from private experts who debated the effectiveness of digital contact-tracing efforts and other initiatives using big data to understand the spread of the virus and how to contain it.


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The Telegraph

As apps tracing Covid-19 spring up, there are fears for the safety of our private data. But Shafi Goldwasser may have the solution


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CPO Magazine

From the hijinks of “Zoom bombing” to serious encryption failures, the rapidly-growing Zoom can’t seem to get through three consecutive days without a new issue popping up. As this list of security concerns grows, more and more organizations are deciding that the platform simply is not worth the risk.


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Reuters

BRUSSELS – EU industry chief Thierry Breton on Wednesday told Apple Chief Executive Tim Cook to make sure that mobile apps to limit the spread of coronavirus work on its iPhones and other devices, amidst the company’s spat with France on its privacy safeguards.


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IT Pro Portal

The British government acted unlawfully by handing the US information on two suspected Isis terrorists without assurances the death penalty would not be used, the Supreme Court ruled last month.


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The Atlantic

Facebook and other platforms insisted that they didn’t want to be “arbiters of truth.” The coronavirus changed their mind overnight.


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Bloomberg

New guidelines published this week warn that the apps must not be used to ‘control, stigmatise or repress individuals’


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Computer Weekly ($)

Despite the Finance Bill Sub-Committee claiming it would argue for the IR35 reforms to be delayed even if there were no pandemic, HM Treasury remains committed to revised April 2021 roll-out date


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City AM

We are living in unprecedented times. Due to the human disruption caused by the coronavirus pandemic, a financial downturn is upon us. Against this difficult backdrop, it is my belief that ‘Regtech’, regulatory technology, is very well positioned to weather the storm.


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ABC Australia

The Federal Government has ordered the competition watchdog to develop a mandatory code of conduct to govern commercial dealings between tech giants and news media companies.


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Part of the world of governments regulating tech companies touches on media. Here ABC reports on what is considered a first-of-its-kind mandatory code of conduct in Australia.

AdAge

Just a few months ago, the 2020s loomed as a decade of significant transformation for the advertising industry. Less than two years after the European Union implemented the GDPR to address consumer concerns about access to personal data, the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) went into effect on Jan. 1, leaving brands, ad tech vendors and publishers scrambling to figure out what they need to do to comply. Then, a couple of weeks later, Google announced that its Chrome web browser, following similar moves by Safari and Firefox, would eliminate cookies by January 2022, further complicating how, in the not-too-distant future, digital advertising would reach customers without access to the third-party data that had become the standard for programmatic initiatives.


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