#7
single distill image banner

  • Germany’s contact tracing (#7)
  • Hawley and Amazon antitrust (#14)
  • SIM deadline in Myanmar (#9)
  • Quibi’s data share (#21)


Selection and ranking powered by

deepnews logo


Story Source
Nikkei

GURUGRAM, India — By the second week of March, India had only recorded around 50 cases of COVID-19, but the country felt on edge, poised for the outbreak to explode. On social media, rumors had begun to fly.


Editor’s Note:


Tech Crunch

Every time we realize something new about the coronavirus, it’s always worse than we thought: maybe we don’t develop immunity to it; maybe six feet of social distancing isn’t far enough; maybe the spread won’t wane in warmer weather.


Editor’s Note:


Vox EU

The rise of stablecoins and asset-backed tokens could drive the development of financial markets via new forms of transparency and data credibility. This column uses the revised proposal for the Libra global stablecoin as an example to illustrate possibilities for supervisors to harness information in distributed ledger based-finance via ’embedded supervision’. The aim is to increase the quality of data available to supervisors and to reduce administrative costs for firms.


Editor’s Note:


Daily Pioneer

A bottom-up approach would ensure that the benefits of digitisation are enjoyed by all, particularly by those who need them the most


Editor’s Note:


IT Pro Portal

The news that Facebook is backing off plans to sell ads in WhatsApp’s main chat stream comes as little surprise to those in the ad-tech industry.


Editor’s Note:


Security Boulevard

Global privacy regulations have given consumers a number of rights to ensure they have more control over their data. This control is important because this data can be stored by an organization and used for research or even sold to advertisers or data brokerages. The CCPA and GDPR classify consumers as “data subjects” and provide them various data privacy rights such as right of access, right to deletion, right to opt-out and several more.


Editor’s Note:


Reuters

BERLIN: Germany changed course on Sunday (Apr 26) over which type of smartphone technology it wanted to use to trace coronavirus infections, backing an approach supported by Apple and Google along with a growing number of other European countries.


Editor’s Note:


Brookings Institution

The speed with which the COVID-19 pandemic has shifted the public conversation about technology is extraordinary. Just two months ago the New York Times was running scathing editorials about the perils of smartphone surveillance, while the Democratic candidates for president sought to outflank each other in their criticism of Silicon Valley. With the backlash against Big Tech in full swing, the question up for debate was not whether the tech industry should be regulated, but instead how aggressive those regulations should be.


Editor’s Note:


Myanmar Times

The Posts and Telecommunications Department (PTD) set the April 30 deadline back in February – before the COVID-19 outbreak was declared a pandemic — saying that more controls over SIM-card ownership were needed to make electronic transactions more secure and to curb crime. Users are also to be restricted to two SIM cards from one operator.


Editor’s Note:


Government reaction to big tech is not just on social networks, but also on phone companies, particularly as phones and payments are increasingly linked. Here Thompson Chau reports for the Myanmar Times about a deadline that has fallen in the middle of a pandemic.

Lawfare

In its opinion filed April 9, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit greenlighted a mix of privacy claims levied against Facebook in In Re Facebook, Inc. Internet Tracking Litigation, reversing the lower court’s decision to dismiss the case. The plaintiffs in the case are a class of Facebook users alleging that the social media company tracked their browser histories from May 2010 to September 2011 when they visited third-party websites featuring Facebook “Like” buttons.


Editor’s Note:


WSJ ($)

FBI Director Christopher Wray, who has been pushing tech companies to give law-enforcement authorities access to encrypted messages, once advocated the opposite view when representing Facebook Inc.’s FB 5.42% WhatsApp in a legal case involving the messaging service’s use of such technology, according to a new court filing.


Editor’s Note:


Euro News

While the tragic human consequences of COVID-19 have played out on nightly news bulletins, regulators across Europe have scrambled to adjust their approach to minimise its immediate and longer-term economic consequences. Early on, the UK’s Information Commissioner (ICO) declared its reasonableness and pragmatism in the face of the health emergency and, on 15 April, it fleshed this out in a publication setting out its regulatory approach during the coronavirus pandemic.


Editor’s Note:


Euractiv

The talk of the digital future is immensely in vogue. However, the future is already here. Nothing reveals and increases our reliance on virtual connection for work, education, business, and social life more than the current pandemic, writes Miroslava Sawiris.


Editor’s Note:


The Verge

Sen. Josh Hawley (R-MO) is calling on federal prosecutors to open a criminal antitrust investigation into Amazon, as laid out in a letter released on Tuesday.


Editor’s Note:


Deccan Herald

Kerala Chief Minister Pinarayi VIjayan on Friday said the interim order of the High Court on the COVID-19 data collection controversy is a setback to the opposition Congress which had raised allegations against the Left government.


Editor’s Note:


Deseret News

SOUTH JORDAN — Utah Attorney General Sean Reyes announced Tuesday that the state has suspended use of the technology services of Park City-based Banjo after it was revealed company founder Damien Patton has past connections with a white supremacist group and was involved in a shooting at a Jewish synagogue in the early ’90s.


Editor’s Note:


Here is one that also appeared in our “Face Value” Distill for its implications on surveillance. Following a report on the KKK links of Banjo’s executive, Utah is looking again at the system that the system he was working on with the government

The Register

New rules let Beijing review purchases after pondering ‘political, diplomatic, and trade factors’ for up to three months


Editor’s Note:


NY Times

LONDON — When Europe enacted the world’s toughest privacy law nearly two years ago, it was heralded as a model to crack down on the invasive, data-hungry practices of the world’s largest technology companies.


Editor’s Note:


The Telegraph ($)

New duty of care laws to protect children from online harms could be pushed back to 2023, says the NSPCC, amid fears tech giants will exploit the delay to lobby ministers to water down the plans.


Editor’s Note:


The Independent (UK)

Offering no bailouts to firms who use the current system to pay less than their fair share is a start, but our 100-year-old tax system needs an overhaul


Editor’s Note:


Variety

Quibi shared the email addresses of users who signed up for the service with third-party advertising and tracking companies through plain-text web links, a new study claims. Less than a month after its April 6 launch, Quibi was discovered to be making available email addresses of users who clicked on confirmation links on signup to third-party partners via plain text in the URL (i.e., the email addresses were readable in the link), according to report published Wednesday by Zach Edwards, founder of analytics consulting firm Victory Medium.


Editor’s Note:


ABC Australia

Google has been ordered to pay $40,000 in damages to a Melbourne lawyer after a Supreme Court of Victoria ruling found the internet giant was a publisher, and had defamed the man. George Defteros has successfully sued Google over web searches that brought up his name in relation to associations with Victoria’s gangland figures.


Editor’s Note:


Australia continues to be the place where much is happening on the front of tech companies as “publishers.” Following last week’s “code of conduct,” here ABC reports about a court ruling in Melbourne.

Brookings Institution

While America spent the past decade upgrading its bank-based magnetic striped cards with chips, China experienced a retail payment revolution. Leapfrogging the card-based system, two new payment systems have come to dominate person-to-person, retail, and many business transactions. China’s new system is built on digital wallets, QR codes (two-dimensional bar codes), and runs through their own big tech firms: Alipay running through Alibaba (China’s version of Amazon) and WeChat Pay running through Tencent (China’s version of Facebook). China’s system largely disintermediates banks from payment transactions, robbing banks of an important and long-standing source of revenue


Editor’s Note:


Financial Times ($)

After pausing work on this year’s Digital Services Act during the coronavirus crisis, senior EU officials are now considering plans to force companies such as Google, Twitter and Facebook to be more transparent. “We need to be able to look under the hood,” said one person with direct knowledge of the discussions. “Currently, we have no systematic way of finding out what’s going on. In the areas of disinformation or illegal content we always have to take the company’s word for it.”


Editor’s Note:


Reuters

WASHINGTON – Facebook Inc (FB.O) will allow users in the United States and Canada to transfer photos and videos to a rival tech platform for the first time – a step that could assuage antitrust concerns by giving users an option to easily leave the company’s services, the social media network said on Thursday.


Editor’s Note:



($) = This source has a hard paywall. You will need to suscribe to view this article.