#9
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  • Facebook’s “American Edge” (#2)
  • Huawei in Zimbabwe (#9)
  • Big Tech and the news (#8)
  • France’s hate speech law (#10)


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The Drum

As Facebook gears to connect the next billion people, they expect 70% to come from Asia and nearly 337m from India alone.


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Washington Post

The organization, called American Edge, arrives at a time when the industry is facing withering antitrust scrutiny in Washington.


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One of the biggest interactions between the government and Big Tech is of course lobbying. Here WaPo writes about “American Edge” and ties it to Facebook.

ZDNet

Most 911 dispatchers have less information about an emergency call than a hungry customer has about a pizza order, including status and location information. An emergency communications company wants to make those emergency calls more information rich by using cloud technology, automation, and IoT gateways.


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Quartz

A recent ethical hack into its coronavirus contact-tracing app has brought back bitter memories for the government of India.


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New Statesman

The public had already had enough of tax avoidance by the time the Coronavirus hit Europe in February. But the prospect of billionaire tax exiles asking the British taxpayer for cash has provoked fresh outrage.


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Biometric Update

European Digital Rights (EDRi) has published a paper demanding the European Commission and EU Member States institute a ban on biometric mass surveillance.


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The Intercept

For a few fleeting moments during the New York governor Andrew Cuomo’s daily coronavirus briefing on Wednesday 6 May, the sombre grimace that has filled our screens for weeks was briefly replaced by something resembling a smile.


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New York Times

It reads like a coroner’s report on the news business, 623 pages filled with charts and graphs detailing the devastating decline in local news and public policy reporting of the past decade. It landed on the Australian prime minister’s desk last summer, unnoticed by most news consumers in America and around the world.


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Zimbabwe Independent

On May 4, 2020, Technomag, an online magazine, published an article stating that plans to install surveillance cameras in Harare were at an advanced stage.


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The world of “smart cities” often touches on the world of data privacy. Here lawyers from a particular part of the world, Zimbabwe, worry about new CCTV cameras from Huawei that have shown up in the capital city of Harare.

WSJ ($)

Social-media companies must remove content deemed hateful in France within 24 hours, or face fines of up to 4% of global revenue.


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POLITICO

Amazon’s runaway success during the coronavirus pandemic has brought the firm’s valuation to new heights, but there is likely to be a price to pay: tougher scrutiny from regulators.


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Security Boulevard

When it comes to cybersecurity, everyone needs to be part of the solution if we ever hope to slow the rising tide of cyberattacks


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EU Observer

National authorities have already released or plan to roll out contact-tracing apps across the EU, with the idea that these technologies make it easier and quicker for health authorities to alert or find those potentially exposed to the coronavirus.


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CPO Magazine

Contact tracing is one of the most effective tools in a public health emergency. The COVID-19 pandemic has created the need for any contact tracing program to expand to nearly the entire population. Naturally, this creates clear potential for infringement on privacy and civil rights. Additionally, some countries have either national or regional laws forbidding this sort of data use. So is it possible to balance privacy concerns with measures necessary to limiting the damage done in the fight against COVID-19? The Hunton Andrews Kurth LLP Centre for Information Policy Leadership believes it’s possible, and posits that organizational accountability measures are the key to making it work.


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Bloomberg

The loss of privacy to individuals once their data is on contact-tracing apps will spread far beyond public health.


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POLITICO

In the digital fight against COVID-19, Big Tech squared off against governments — and won.


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One of the recurring themes in this newsletter has been the COVID tracing apps. Here a team of reporters covering much of Europe digs in-depth on how different countries such as France and Germany are dealing with Google and Apple in different ways.

Irish Independent

A finding of over 37.5C means you’re unlikely to get in, as hospital authorities fear you might be contagious.


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Forbes

By now everyone should have had time to digest the basic contours of the OECD pillar 1 (nexus and profit allocation) and pillar 2 (global minimum tax) proposals. These reforms are bold and ambitious. If broadly adopted, they would alter the international consensus that has delineated national taxing rights for almost 100 years. But not everyone likes the two pillars. Many businesses are squirming at the thought of formulary apportionment concepts creeping into the mainstream, while practitioners are uneasy with increased complexity. As with our virus-induced lockdowns, we sometimes need to be reminded why we’re subjecting ourselves to the collective angst.


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Bloomberg

Google’s takeover of fitness tracker Fitbit could be “a game-changer” for health data that will need close European Union scrutiny, consumer advocates said.


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Engineering & Technology

A coalition of 20 advocacy groups has accused TikTok of violating US child privacy laws and breaching a settlement agreed in February 2019 with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC).


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Deccan Herald

Trust Deficit: Govt must open up the source code to the Aarogya Setu app to gain people’s trust


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POLITICO

WASHINGTON — For anyone watching Facebook’s public struggles over the past few years, the opening months of the coronavirus crisis marked a head-spinning change. Suddenly, a company in a defensive crouch after a long set of embarrassments and public relations battles was putting itself out everywhere.


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Reuters

Amazon Inc’s video game live-streaming platform Twitch is forming an advisory council of experienced users, online safety experts and anti-bullying advocates to help improve safety on the site, Twitch said in a blog post on Thursday.


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The Verge

Last month, after Apple and Google announced some changes to their forthcoming attempt to track the spread of COVID-19, I noted the surprising degree to which tech giants are setting the terms of the pandemic response. They own the hardware, they own the software, and national governments who would use it to find new cases of COVID-19 have to do it on the companies’ terms.


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Gulf News

Abu Dhabi: Naming of Muslim Brotherhood-affiliated Yemeni Nobel Prize winner Tawakkol Karman as a member of Facebook’s first oversight board has sparked widespread public anger among opinion leaders in Arab countries, who strongly rejected the censoring by those known for their support for extremist ideology.


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