#67
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Deepnews Digest #67

Schoolhouse Rocked

Editor: Christopher Brennan
Graduation caps have been replaced for many by face masks. It is one more sign, if students didn’t know already, that this year is not normal. Around the world administrators are also looking to the summer not as a vacation but as a critical period for finding out what the “new normal” for education looks like, the subject of this Digest. These articles from New Hampshire to Namibia explore angles such as technology, visas, and the ever-important subject of inequality in schooling. Gathered with the Deepnews Scoring Model, we hope they help you learn something new.


Editor’s Note: If you’re yearning to go back to school by looking at particular subjects, it is now free to sign up on our website for our topical newsletters such as Green Energy or Over the Moon. You can also follow us more closely on Facebook, Twitter and Linkedin.
Story Source
NPR
The coronavirus test wasn’t as bad as Celeste Torres imagined. Standing outside a dorm at the University of California, San Diego, Torres stuck a swab up a nostril, scanned a QR code, and went on with the day.

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Hindu Business Line
Online education may have its takers in urban schools, but has pushed students and teachers in rural India deeper into the margins

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Chalkbeat Indiana
For the first weeks after the coronavirus pushed Indianapolis to close down school buildings, Azah Gillespy’s 5-year-old son worked on assignments that came by mail. The family didn’t have high-speed internet at home, so her kindergartner wouldn’t be able to join his teacher and classmates on the video lessons his school began holding each day.

Editor’s Note: The pandemic has made inequality in access to the internet one of the most pressing concerns for educators around the world. Though often times thought of as a rural issue, here Dylan Peers McCoy and Stephanie Wang report from Indianapolis and delve into gaps in urban access. – Christopher Brennan, Editor

Observer Research Foundation
During the Ebola crisis, a large number of girls dropped out of school due to an increase in domestic, caring responsibilities as well as a shift towards income generation. In most cases, boys were prioritised over girls to attend school.

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Boston Globe
At least 10,000 Boston public school students do not register as having logged in to class this month, suggesting they could be virtual dropouts whose formal education stopped two months ago when schools shut down to slow the spread of the coronavirus.

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Seacoast Online (New Hampshire)
While Seacoast schools gear-up for a hopeful return to buildings and in-person instruction in the fall, in tandem with that preparation is planning for the expected learning gaps and disparities that will quickly reveal themselves in classrooms.

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Irish Times
Pandemic. A word I was aware of but never thought would so become part of our daily discourse. Social distancing. A cold term, which as it has turned out, is exactly what it means. Its effects are many and varied.

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The Independent (UK)
For the first time in the lifetimes of this generation of athlete, the fragility of sport has been truly exposed, writes Vithushan Ehantharajah. And so many are turning to remote learning services

Editor’s Note: As some graduate into an uncertain world, an economic downturn may mean that many people turn back to school. Here Vithushan Ehantharajah reports on the “fragility of sport” and athletes moving into the digital classroom. -Christopher Brennan, Editor

The Conversation
COVID-19 has had a significant impact on all Australians, but there are very good reasons why the impact might be more keenly felt by people with disability and their carers.

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Post and Courier (South Carolina)
Davia Bunch, who graduated this month from the University of South Carolina, is seeking to have her lawsuit become a class-action and draw some of the other 32,000 students kept off campus since mid-March to halt the spread of COVID-19.

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HuffPost
By finding ways to continue learning through the pandemic, the education system will be better equipped for a future marked by severe weather emergencies.

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Business Insider
Some of these educators are former teachers or people who have degrees in education, and they charge between $25 and $60 an hour for their services.

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Central Maine Morning Sentinel
As the coronavirus pandemic has forced changes to Colby’s final weeks of classes and traditional commencement ceremonies, members of the class of 1970 recall how protests and tension that year also disrupted the end of the semester even as their own 50th reunion is now canceled.

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Telangana Today
The adverse impact of Covid-19 on museums across the world has upset many museum aficionados. Perhaps, it’s for the first time that museums across the world have been shut for such a long time owing to a single reason. Though the spread of the coronavirus has created an extremely tough situation for many of them, resulting in total cancellation or rescheduling of their activities, a few of them have also leveraged the crisis to emerge as leaders by alerting the public to take precautions.

Editor’s Note: This Digest looks at the idea of education broadly, including museums. Here V Ashok Vardhan writes that this is the moment where they also need to make the leap to digital. – Christopher Brennan, Editor

The Daily Beast
Children are much less likely to be infected, less likely to become severely ill, and less likely to spread infection. We should let our children return to their normal lives.

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Inside Higher Ed
The Trump administration is reportedly considering temporary restrictions on a program that lets more than 200,000 international students stay in the U.S. and work after they graduate.

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Chalkbeat Newark
Before the coronavirus swept in, Samani Ford had a trusted system for achieving her goals: dream, plan, and execute.

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Chronicle of Higher Education
After months of preparation, Cornell University in early March was ready to launch its plan to get its entire student body counted in the 2020 Census.

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Bloomberg
The net flow of talent and knowledge goes eastward across the Pacific, and China struggles to get scientists to return home. Why make that job easier?

Editor’s Note: As the New York Times piece below reported, the US is planning on moving against certain graduate students from China. Here Virginia Postrel writes for Bloomberg on why she believes that would be a mistake.

The Namibian
How African higher education evolves will largely depend on whether universities are able to embrace the interconnectedness and interdependency of Africa’s social and economic realities. They will need to resist the temptation to respond to immediate challenges in isolation

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The Nation (US)
On May 1, graduate students at more than 75 public and private universities across the United States and Canada mobilized under the name “X Campus” to protest conditions for student workers.

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New York Times
The move is the latest in the Trump administration’s efforts to impose limits on Chinese students. But university officials say the government is paranoid, and that the United States will lose out.

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NPR
Austin Beutner looked haggard, his face a curtain of worry lines. The superintendent of the second-largest school district in the nation sat at a desk last week delivering a video address to Los Angeles families. But he began with a stark message clearly meant for another audience:

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Daily Signal
When elementary and secondary schools began closing in March due to the coronavirus pandemic, most parents assumed they would reopen in a matter of weeks.

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Duke Chronicle
On the first day of spring break, Duke’s campus was mobbed. The warm afternoon sun beat down on a crowd of rowdy students pouring into Krzyzewskiville, eager to inaugurate another game day with a bit of revelry. Soon, they entered Cameron Indoor Stadium and packed tightly into Section 17, facing down the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Thousands of other fans, equally unaware they were witnessing Duke’s final game of the season, meandered through crowded concourses and squeezed into their seats.

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