Trump Added to Naughty List – Deepnews Digest #33

deepnews logo

Deepnews Digest #33

Trump Added to Naughty List

Just before the holidays, President Trump has become the third commander-in-chief impeached by the U.S. House. A trial is coming to town next year and Democrats are double checking their lists of senators who could vote for removal. There are a lot of shallow pieces out there about what it all means, but Deepnews hopes you read these good ones, for goodness sake.

Story Source
The New York Times
GREENWOOD, S.C. — The past three years have not been easy for the political fortunes or the emotional health of America’s Democrats. To the extent they feel optimistic about anything, they have been waiting for the 2020 election in the way inhabitants of a storm-ravaged city might look toward the end of hurricane season — as an opportunity to restore order not just to their fractured physical world, but to their battered psyches.

Editor’s Note:

Vox
At the moment, that doesn’t mean too much, since Congress is leaving Washington for the holidays and the Senate wasn’t going to begin an impeachment trial until January anyway. Still, it leaves the anticipated next step of the impeachment saga — Trump’s Senate trial, which was expected to start (and end) in January — in at least some doubt.

Editor’s Note:

Reason
Many of the presidents beefs are frivolous, but he is right that impeachment has been rushed.

Editor’s Note:

USA Today
In 1974, the televised Watergate hearings that eventually led to President Richard Nixon’s resignation before he could be formally impeached were riveting must-see-TV.

Editor’s Note: The events of impeachment are in D.C., but the audience is everywhere. Here, reporters for USA Today contrast the “must-see-TV” of 1974’s Watergate hearings with 2019’s impeachment. They dispatched reporters to all corners of the country to get a “man on the street” reaction piece from all sorts of people on all sorts of streets and bars around the U.S.

The Nation Magazine
Jamie Raskin is trying to read a book about impeachment every couple of days. On a Tuesday in late November, when final preparations were being made for the Trump impeachment inquiry to move to the House Judiciary Committee on which he sits, the Democratic congressman from Maryland was racing out of his office. He realized he’d left behind the most recent book, circled back to his office, and grabbed a slim volume by James Reston Jr., The Impeachment Diary: Eyewitness to the Removal of a President.

Editor’s Note:

Vox
President Donald Trump has committed “multiple federal crimes,” according to a report released Monday by House Democrats on the Judiciary Committee. Specifically, Democrats claim the president’s efforts to condition military aid to Ukraine on investigations into former Vice President Joe Biden’s family violates the federal bribery statutes.

Editor’s Note:

The Atlantic
As the impeachment inquiry lays out central allegations that President Trump abused his power, Ukrainians living in America recognize a familiar playbook.

Editor’s Note:

Roll Call
Those of us on the White House beat covet the access we get to Trump, even if the informal and sometimes fast-paced and wide-ranging gaggles trigger potentially unhealthy amounts of adrenaline in our systems several times per week. But none of this was the case on Wednesday, when I was the print pooler on the most historic day in Washington since, well, Donald John Trump was sworn in as the 45th president of the United States.

Editor’s Note: The day of impeachment, in addition to a political event, was also a media event. Coverage of the White House is often done by a “pool” of media outlets who deisgnate one or two reporters to take turns getting quotes, etc. John T. Bennett was the pool reporter on Wednesday, and reflects here for Roll Call.

AP
WASHINGTON — Donald Trump stands on the threshold of what two ex-presidents called the “profound disgrace” of impeachment, a permanent stain on his legacy.

Editor’s Note:

The New Yorker
Maybe, in some alternate universe, on the second day of the House Judiciary Committee’s hearing about the Democrats’ articles of impeachment against Donald Trump, Republicans on the committee would have presented a detailed and painstakingly constructed argument to show why the evidence doesn’t support the charges against the President. But, in actuality, the Republicans on the Judiciary Committee spent much of their time talking about — you guessed it — Hunter Biden.

Editor’s Note:

Al Jazeera English
WASHINGTON – The United States House of Representatives is expected to vote on Wednesday to impeach President Donald Trump for obstruction of Congress and abuse of power related to his dealings with Ukraine.

Editor’s Note:

Politico
Is there really a way to accomplish this, when Senate acquittal seems such a foregone conclusion? Yes, with a little bit of procedural creativity on the part of the House.

Editor’s Note:

Dallas Observer
In the aftermath of the 2016 election, as everyone scrambled to figure out what a Donald Trump presidency would look like in reality rather than in their worst nightmares or wildest dreams, one thing no one could have predicted was the rise of a certain East Texas congressman

Editor’s Note:

Washington Examiner
The evangelical magazine founded by the Rev. Billy Graham called President Trump’s phone call to the Ukrainian president “profoundly immoral” and called for him to be removed from office.

Editor’s Note:

The New York Times
WASHINGTON — President Trump sat forward on the edge of his chair and chatted at length with reporters in the Oval Office on Thursday, unbowed but for him a little subdued. The day after he was impeached for high crimes and misdemeanors, he dismissed the judgment of the House of Representatives and punched back by celebrating with a Democratic congressman who switched parties to stand with him.

Editor’s Note:

The Hill
All but a few of the 31 House Democrats representing crossover districts where President Trump is popular voted to impeach him on Wednesday after trying to avoid taking such a tough vote for most of this year.

Editor’s Note:

The Atlantic
The president’s narcissism renders him unable to comply with his duties to the nation.

Editor’s Note:

Colorado Independent
WASHINGTON — The U.S. House voted to impeach President Donald Trump Wednesday night, making him the third president to be impeached in U.S. history.

Editor’s Note: Before the decline of many regional and local newspapers, correspondents in Washington would report for audiences back home about how events impacted them and their representatives. The non-profit Colorado Independent did so here, with Colorado a particularly interesting state because of its congressional delegation’s mix of Republicans, Democrats and a Democrat in a district that voted for Trump in 2016.

Rolling Stone
On Wednesday evening, the House of Representatives impeached a sitting president for just the third time in American history, charging Trump with the high crimes of abusing his power to pressure Ukraine to interfere in the 2020 election and of obstructing Congress’ efforts to investigate his international shakedown.

Editor’s Note:

The New York Times
WASHINGTON — It was the rarest of moments in the nation’s capital, a seemingly sincere attempt at persuasion across the partisan breach by the Democratic chairman of the House Judiciary Committee on the eve of the panel’s vote to impeach President Trump.

Editor’s Note:

The Nation Magazine
House Democrats’ vote to impeach President Donald Trump may offer immediate feelings of satisfaction, but it should not be mistaken for a path forward. Behind their lofty rhetoric, Democrats have presented the public with a weak impeachment case and doubled down on a Cold Warrior inflected, failure-ridden political playbook.

Editor’s Note:

National Review
Why do so many grassroots Republicans shrug at President Trump’s efforts to strongarm Ukraine into investigating the Bidens? Because they believe, with some compelling evidence, that this is how the game is played — that powerful figures in government blur their personal interest and the national interest all the time, with no consequence

Editor’s Note:

Associated Press
NEW YORK – The first line of US President Donald Trump’s obituary has been written.

Editor’s Note:

The Atlantic
Senator Lindsey Graham put it crisply. “This thing will come to the Senate, and it will die quickly, and I will do everything I can to make it die quickly,” he said. “I am trying to give a pretty clear signal I have made up my mind. I’m not trying to pretend to be a fair juror here.”

Editor’s Note:

FiveThirtyEight
On Tuesday, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and House Democrats announced two articles of impeachment against President Trump: abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. Soon, the U.S. House will almost certainly vote to pass those two articles. And then things move to the U.S. Senate, where things seem just as inevitable: The GOP-led Senate will block Trump’s removal.

Editor’s Note: The next step after impeachment is, of course, a trial in the U.S. Senate. Several pieces on this list deal with the role of Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, though this from FiveThirtyEight digs into the numbers and why it is unlikely that removal from office will reach 67 votes.

($) = This source has a hard paywall. You will need to suscribe to view this article.