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  • Tim Berners-Lee on WWW
  • Data’s gender gap
  • Women in cybersecurity
  • International Women’s Day


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Financial Times ($)

Whistleblowing is such a lonely business that I was prepared for Susan Fowler to be a rather withdrawn, standoffish lunch date. Instead, she arrives grinning, wearing a bright-pink jumper and exclaiming how happy she is to be here. Although we have never met before, she reaches out for a hug hello and immediately starts chatting.


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Express Computer

The corporate world has been a male-dominated space for decades, but things are now changing for the better. Many industries are now giving women opportunities to prove their mettle and take on more responsibilities. While there are many industries that have begun to see the value of onboarding women, Fintech is opening more avenues than ever before.


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The Verge

Mythic Quest: Raven’s Banquet isn’t just a great comedy about video games, but a strand connecting an older, weirder era of its culture to the more mainstream world of workplace comedies. Few people on the show exemplify this more than Ashly Burch, a writer on Mythic Quest who also plays Rachel, a wide-eyed game tester for the studio that makes the show’s eponymous game.


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The Guardian

The internet is “not working for women” and is fuelling a new era of widespread abuse against females, the creator of the world wide web, Tim Berners-Lee, warned on Thursday.


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This Distill deals not just with women working at tech companies, but about issues that they face in the tech space. Here the Guardian covers Tim Berners-Lee’s letter to mark the 31st birthday of the web.

Forbes

A rising tide lifts all boats, and when it comes to ensuring women’s representation, the impact is a tidal wave of innovative perspectives that help business and society flourish. For corporations, efforts to improve leadership diversity are measurably linked with profitability and value creation. Clearly, everyone has a stake in the advancement of women. Counterintuitively, efforts to increase the percentage of women in senior leadership may mask the real reason men continue to outnumber women at the top.


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ZDNet

Australian cybersecurity megamix CyberCX has launched a scholarship fund and other initiatives to attract and promote women in industry careers.


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Refinery 29

The tech industry is largely a man’s world, and a white man’s world at that. According to this National Center For Women & Information Technology study, women of colour made up only about 11% of the computing and mathematical workforce in 2019, with Black women only comprising 3% of the total. These numbers are changing for the better, albeit slowly. And if we want to change the face of the Silicon Valley archetype, representation is imperative.


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Security Boulevard

“It is amazing what a woman can do if only she ignores what men tell her she can’t.”


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D Magazine

Despite the large migration of tech industry leaders to Dallas—a movement magnified by Uber’s relocation of their headquarters to Deep Ellum—recent reports suggest that the new tech jobs added are not being filled by women, and those that are don’t pay as well as the rest of the nation, or even other parts of the state.


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Florida International University

Armana S. Huq, a doctoral student in civil and transportation engineering at FIU and assistant professor at the Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (BUET), knows what it’s like to be a woman in the male-dominated field of engineering.


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Daily Dot

A new Firefox extension works like an ad blocker to hide misogynistic and sexist comments from your Twitter feed.


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The Register

Hewlett Packard Enterprise celebrated the work of its female staff on International Women’s Day with stock photos of suited models rather than, you know, its actual employees.


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International Women’s Day earlier this month saw many companies make statements about giving women a leading role. Here The Register points out one that was less well thought out than others.

Bloomberg

Action comes after years of internal turmoil at search giant


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Times of India

In India, girls comprise 50% of science and 30% of engineering students, among the highest in the world.


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Independent (Nigeria)

Focused on promoting gender equality, increasing female representation in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) careers and providing support and direction for professional women, Jane Egerton-Idehen, a Tech Executive, Author and Speaker has launched ‘Be Fearless, Campaign’ a national campaign focused on highlighting the hurdles that prevent women from fulfilling their potential, and providing a guide to younger women on the complexities of navigating career and life opportunities in their fields.


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ASPI Strategist

So, in our quest for knowledge, we need to take the time to pause and think about the kind of world we want as we innovate. That means we have to consider the unintended consequences and alternative applications. And we must ensure women are at the table shaping our technology-dependent future


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New Times (Rwanda)

Rwanda’s Minister for ICT and Innovation, Paula Ingabire, has been named among 115 young global leaders of the year 2020 by the World Economic Forum (WEF).


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Inter Press Service

Although women’s participation in the labor force and in leadership positions increased over the past decades, gender stereotyping is a norm and gender equality is still an elusive idea. Often women are shown through illustrations in school text books as homemakers and teachers. Girls are shown to be eating or serving food juxtaposed with boys who are happily illustrated playing the drum or the ‘tabla’.


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The Data Administration Newsletter

In an ideal world, all the features and functions of society would be accessible and useful for all members of the population. However, it is becoming an increasingly visible fact that more often than not, half of the population isn’t considered when gathering and applying data.


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The role of gender in tech is not just one of personnel but also data. Here Mandy Seiner, who works for the NYC government, discusses why she is launching a recurring column on “Data’s Gender Gap.”

Irish Independent

World Wide Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee has warned that “the web is not working for women and girls”, in an open letter to mark the 31st anniversary of its creation.


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Your Story

As a woman in tech and Director – Engineering Programs and Leader – NetApp Excellerator at NetApp, Madhurima is passionate about giving back to the ecosystem by nurturing innovation and talent through helping and enabling people build successful companies and careers.


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Mercury News

When theatre director, educator and playwright Kirsten Brandt’s 14-year-old daughter declared her desire to pursue a career as a game developer, Brandt’s first reaction was immense pride.


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CNet

“I realized along the way that my voice was just as important,” said Michelle David, a UX designer at Zynga.


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TechCrunch

Women pioneered the field of computer technology. Yet, in 2020, the sector is still dominated by men. Though the industry has made efforts toward achieving diversity and inclusion, progress has been slow, with only 26% of women — and even fewer Hispanic (2%) and African American (3%) women — currently in the tech workforce.


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Daily Trojan

With sleeping bags, energy drinks and laptops in tow, the attendees of AthenaHacks stream onto USC’s campus from all across the country every year to hunker down on a weekend technology project. They form small teams and attend workshops led by industry sponsors on tools to build virtual reality experiences, mobile apps and more. They listen to speakers, pitch their projects and win prizes, components of a typical hackathon. What’s not typical is that all of them — the organizers, guest speakers and participants — are women.


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