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  • She solved decades-old problem (#2)
  • Workplace training videos (#14)
  • Sundar Pichai on diversity (#10)
  • From inclusion to influence (#18)


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Nature

Early analyses suggest that female academics are posting fewer preprints and starting fewer research projects than their male peers.


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Quanta Magazine

It took Lisa Piccirillo less than a week to answer a long-standing question about a strange knot discovered over half a century ago by the legendary John Conway.


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Can you wrap your head around three- and four-dimensional shapes? Lisa Piccirillo can. Here Erica Klarreich reports on how the doctoral student untied a vexing knot problem.

Business Insider ($)

3% — that’s the share of venture capital startups led by all female founders receive, according to a 2019 report by Pitchbook and the National Venture Capital Association. Meanwhile, black female entrepreneurs have received just .0006% of VC funds since 2009.


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Vice

The suit alleges that a male-dominated company culture rewards “bubbly women” who “succumb to the sexual advances of their male managers.”


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Columbia University

A landmark review of the role of artificial intelligence (AI) in the future of global health published in The Lancet calls on the global health community to establish guidelines for development and deployment of new technologies and to develop a human-centered research agenda to facilitate equitable and ethical use of AI. The review and recommendations were developed by Nina Schwalbe, MPH, adjunct professor in the Heilbrunn Department of Population and Family Health at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, and Principal Visiting Fellow at United Nations University – International Institute for Global Health, and Brian Wahl, PhD, assistant acientist in the Department of International Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.


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Crunchbase

Many horror stories have recently come out about layoffs in the startup world, in both the U.S. and Europe. From Bird and Eventbrite to Yelp and Lyft, thousands of tech employees have been furloughed or directly laid off over recent weeks.


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The Conversation

Women are highly underrepresented in the field of cybersecurity. In 2017, women’s share in the U.S. cybersecurity field was 14%, compared to 48% in the general workforce.


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ZDNet

With the release of its annual Corporate Responsibility Report this year, Intel is reflecting on the progress it’s made over the last 10 years in areas like diversity and inclusion and environmental sustainability. It’s also looking forward to the next 10 years — coming to the conclusion that meaningful change will take cooperation from the rest of the technology industry as well as other outside partners.


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Jerusalem Post

Gender inequality in the workforce is less noticeable in Jerusalem than in other cities in Israel, according to the report. A 20% wage difference was reported between men and women in Jerusalem, compared to a 33% difference throughout Israel and a 32% difference in Tel Aviv. While the percentage of women working in hi-tech in Jerusalem (5.1%) is a bit lower than among men (7%), the difference in Tel Aviv and Haifa is almost twice as much. Haredi women make up 80% of the haredi workforce in the city’s hi-tech sector.


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The Verge

But there were two big stories about Google that are important [from last week]. I want to ask two questions about them right away. First, there’s a big NBC piece from April Glaser suggesting that your diversity efforts have been wound down [and] that the company is not even using the word “diversity” internally anymore. Is that true?


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Last week this list saw a NBC piece about Google’s action against diversity programs. Here its chief Sundar Pichai responds as part of a longer interview with The Verge.

LA Review of Books

Rodham mixes what might have been with what was. Many characters — Bill, Hillary, Obama, and Trump — keep their names, even as Sittenfeld assigns them fictional lives. While Bill holds the office of governor of Arkansas in the book, as he did in real life, here he goes on to become a skeevy tech titan, filthy rich in the sense that he has a lot of money and in the sense that he spends much of it on silencing the women he has assaulted.


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NY Times

Previous financial crises gave rise to high-profile American companies. The spread of the coronavirus challenges entrepreneurs to meet new needs.


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Forbes

In previous articles I’ve written about the boost to western economies that can be achieved by ensuring gender equality in entrepreneurship. The general idea is that persistent inequality means that too much of the talent we have available to us is being left untapped.


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Vice

SACRAMENTO — Earlier this year, a group of actors gathered at a theater in Sacramento for their latest performance: Starring in a video about sexual harassment that would be used in compliance training courses at workplaces across the country.


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Indian Express

Women are bearing a disproportionate amount of the burden that the imposition of lockdowns, shrinking of economic opportunity has created.


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Daily Nation (Kenya)

Experts ask governments to set up stimulus packages for women running SMEs


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COVID is affecting women entrepreneurs around the world, though in some areas there are particular problems. Here the Daily Nation reports on fears of increased inequality, lack of access to technology and the digitization of businesses.

Express Computer

Talking about gender neutrality, many leading corporations have stepped forward, and have done away with gender biases. However, a lot of times it’s easier said than done, and things are not meted out properly. For this section of Women in Tech, we have aboard Kalavathi GV who heads Philips Innovation Campus in India, to give us an inkling about women operating in the professional space.


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University of Pennsylvania

Data scientists are much in demand. Beyond the domains one might expect — technology, the internet and telecommunications — they are being sought in energy, financial services, manufacturing, healthcare, pharmaceuticals, and other industries, according to recruiting firm Smith Hanley Associates.


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BetaKit

The Government of Canada has committed $15 million in new capital to support women entrepreneurs amid the ongoing economic crisis brought on by COVID-19.


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Euronews

Twitter has told its employees they can work from home permanently — even after the COVID-19 pandemic.


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Silicon Angle

Remote is the new order of business. Leaders are being forced to create new company cultures on the fly as physical barriers between home and work vanish and previous back-burner issues, such as inclusion, have become critical calls to action.


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Vox

Amid the coronavirus crisis, millions of Americans are working from home and trying to balance their home lives. And women, specifically, are bearing the brunt of the labor.


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JAXenter

Women are underrepresented in the tech sector — myth or reality? Three years ago, we launched a diversity series aimed at bringing the most inspirational and powerful women in the tech scene to your attention. Today, we’d like you to meet Masha Sharma, Co-Founder & CTO at RealAtom.


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Venture Beat

Last Tuesday, Google shared a blog post highlighting the perspectives of three women of color employees on fairness and machine learning. I suppose the comms team saw trouble coming: The next day NBC News broke the news that diversity initiatives at Google are being scrapped over concern about conservative backlash, according to eight current and former employees speaking on condition of anonymity.


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Business Insider

This could be attributed to the fact that high-paid software engineers are more likely to be male than female.


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