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  • Working from home
  • Women and gaming culture
  • New grant guidelines
  • Survey results on innovation


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The Conversation

The business of prophesying the future of work has a gender problem. Admittedly, some of the scenarios around automation predict gains when it comes to workplace equality. But until the people shaping the debate are more representative of wider society, these visions are presenting a skewed version of the future of work.


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The Drum

A group of women in tech have banded together to highlight gender inequality in the tech world for the ‘#SheTransformsTech’ social media campaign.


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CNET

Clara Reeves takes an honest look at being a woman in gaming, and how Crossy Road Castle is a beacon of positivity in an uncertain time.


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Financial Times ($)

When she was named chief risk officer of Wells Fargo nearly two years ago, Mandy Norton became the only woman to run risk management for one of the top five US banks. Standing out is nothing new for the straight-talking Brit, who recalls being one of the few women on JPMorgan’s London trading floor in the 1990s.


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Nature

The US national academy is urging funders to subject institutions to ‘equity audits’ to increase the representation of women — especially those from minority ethnic groups — in science, technology, engineering, mathematics and medicine (STEMM).


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Organizations have been pushing to give more women more of a voice in STEM, and now the National Academy of Sciences wants to help by making it a matter of funding.

Forbes

The times have certainly been turbulent, no more so than now: a world fighting Coronavirus COVID19, but the mode of female-led co-operation and interaction is still ongoing argues Rita Trehan, CEO of global transformation consultancy Dare Worldwide. She points to a UN global survey released this year which found gender bias is still holding women back: just 6 percent of FTSE 100 chiefs are women.


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Jakarta Post

A collective movement aims to overcome the under-representation of women inside Wikimedia. At Eduplex, a co-working space in Bandung, participants signed the attendance list and had a coffee break, some already dressed in light gray T-shirts bearing the word “WikiGap”


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Vice

How early marketing campaigns for online gaming platforms suggested toxicity isn’t a bug, it’s a feature.


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The Guardian

The co-author of Data Feminism on the importance of recognising discrimination in algorithms, understanding it at a technical level – and introducing measures to stamp it out


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Adweek

Female entrepreneurs can find opportunities for growth through mentoring and networking


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Scientific American

A physics student has founded an international organization for mentoring women in male-dominated fields


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Business Insider

Many of its members are founders of startups and small businesses, ranging from socially conscious fashion brands and international coworking spaces to companies that help other women navigate the startup world.


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Becker’s Hospital Review

As a co-founder of healthcare technology startup Kyruus and general partner at venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz, Julie Yoo is something of an anomaly — though she finds being singled out as a rare woman in each field both a blessing and a curse. “While it’s nice to be recognized as a trailblazer in any context, it can be irritating to receive praise just on the basis of one’s gender,” she told Becker’s Hospital Review.


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The New York Times

Families are scrambling to balance work and child care in a society where women still do most of the domestic tasks. Will a worldwide emergency change anything?


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One of the biggest issues for much of the world this week is working from home. Here the NYT speaks to women including tech workers about their experiences.

CXO Today

Throughout history women have been denied their share of voice due to their gender. But over time, through sheer grit and boldness, women have challenged this and have pushed their way to rise to the top in the society. Several studies have proven the economic benefits that organizations and the society can reap through gender parity. A gender-equal workplace benefits employee, customers and partners, and that is why we at SAP became the first multinational IT Company to achieve the Economic Dividends for Gender Equality (EDGE) certification.


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The Globe and Mail ($)

The Newfoundland power company has worked hard to increase female representation in its ranks. Now it’s bringing that same focus to kicking coal


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Fast Company

Since the start of the coronavirus outbreak, the conversation around remote work has been growing. It started with companies encouraging employees to stay at home. Within two weeks most companies, especially in tech, were mandating employees to work remotely and to suspend any business travel.


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NextGov

Agencies’ processes for reviewing complaints don’t reflect the full picture.


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Harvard Business Review

To do so, you need to identify the stories you’ve been telling yourself, create a clear vision for your future, focus on what’s in your control, and believe in your abilities.


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BetaKit

The group of tech and marketing professionals is offering pro-bono assistance to local small businesses, restaurants, and bars. Volunteer support is being provided by YYJTech, a Slack group for the tech industry in Victoria, and YYJTechLadies, a Slack group of women in tech in Victoria.


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NJ Biz

Employees are a company’s most important asset. While certain perks like good benefits and a solid 401k plan are important, investing in talent development is a critical component of fostering employee growth and retaining team members. This is especially important for women, as since 2018 women have been joining the workforce at a faster pace than men. As women in business work to climb the metaphorical ladder, it is imperative that their employers work to help lift them up simultaneously.


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Forbes

While there is no shortage of tampon subscription startups in the Femtech space, none have addressed the main pain point involved with periods, which is pain itself. Staying in bed and popping pain killers every month is the traditional way of dealing with menstrual cramps, also known as dysmenorrhea — an affliction that affects more than 80% of women. With governments taxing sanitary products and pharmaceutical companies thriving on pain medication sales, it’s up to visionary entrepreneurs to find innovative solutions for women.


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FossBytes

It’s unbelievable how, being 2020, we are still wondering why women are so underrepresented in STEM fields. But here we are. I could flood you with numbers and estimates that show how, in spite of women comprising 46% of the national workforce, they don’t account for even 20% in STEM-related fields. I don’t think, however, that’ll be necessary — especially if you’re working in one of those fields.


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Survey Monkey

Most workers (63%) in a new Fast Company|SurveyMonkey poll say new ideas at their workplace are equally likely to come from senior and junior people. But, when thinking about their own experiences at work, 71% of the most senior workers—those with titles like president, owner, or C-suite executives—say they personally have “a great deal” of opportunities to contribute new or innovative ideas at work, compared with 43% of those at the senior manager to vice president level, 32% of those at the manager level, and just 22% of individual contributors.


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Workers in tech are often drawn to the industry because they want to innovate. This survey from Fast Company gathered opinions from workers, including breaking down results by gender, about whether they feel they can.

Business Insider ($)

One of the executive’s strategies is training for unconscious biases. She converted in-person meetings into virtual workshops, which she says resulted in a higher completion rate.


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