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  • Equal Pay Day in 2020
  • Feminist cartographers
  • Women in FinTech
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Fast Company

In case you missed it, yesterday was Equal Pay Day in the U.S. — a date that marks how far into the year the average woman must work to match the average man’s salary from the prior year. In honor of this, impact investing firm Arjuna Capital has published its “Gender Pay Scorecard,” an annual report grading companies on the steps they’ve taken to close the gender gap.


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Forbes

This year Equal Pay Day is March 31. Due to gender differences in wages, women, on average, have to work until March 31 to earn what men earned in the previous year alone. According to census reports, women currently earn about 81.6 cents for each dollar earned by a man and thus need to work about 25% more time than men to make up the difference. This gender pay gap is calculated from the census reports of men’s and women’s median annual earnings. For women of color, the pay gap is even larger. However, some argue that this calculation is overblown and that the gender pay gap is much smaller.


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CNET

Women are still getting paid less than men, a new report from tech job search marketplace Hired says.


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Equal Pay Day was earlier this week, as several articles on this list discuss. It is a particularly relevant topic in tech, with its hope of innovation and progress. Here Erin Carson reports on a report from Hired.

Venture Beat

A group of six influential women studying algorithmic bias, AI, and technology, released a spoken word piece titled “Voicing Erasure” to highlight racial bias in the speech recognition systems made by tech giants. Creators also made Voicing Erasure to recognize the exclusion and overlooked contributions of women scholars and researchers.


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Flare

It was her tweeting that got Joanna Woo a job in tech. The University of Waterloo graduate has always loved technology. In high school, she built her own websites. In university, although she completed an honours psychology program, she took a few STEM courses just because. And after she entered the job market, she still kept a toe in the field, volunteering at and helping to organize tech conferences.


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Press Trust of India

Even as more and more women are pursuing careers related to STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics), they encounter roadblocks like entrenched gender stereotypes and pay disparity in their jobs, according to a survey.


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Your Story

Swati Lad, Co-founder of CreditMate, is helping lenders across the country to ease the process of debt collection through a cloud-based platform.


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Ad Age

Because of unconscious gender bias, female leaders like Hillary Clinton are called “shrill” instead of “vocal;” “calculated” instead of “strategic;” “cold” instead of “focused.” They are also called unlikeable for exhibiting the qualities for which we’ve always praised men: ambition, confidence, assertiveness.


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ZDNet

Top US tech companies will face shareholder resolutions seeking detailed disclosures on gender and racial pay differences following poor progress in shrinking the income gaps within their organizations.


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Associated Press

MESA, Ariz. — Rachel Folden figured something out early on during her first spring training with the Chicago Cubs — long before the coronavirus pandemic wiped out team activities.


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While tech has barriers to full participation by women, it can also be a path into fields where women have been excluded. Here the AP looks at changes in baseball in the U.S. and how women are receiving more jobs with different teams.

Rappler

Starting out as a blog, Audrey Pe’s Women in Tech has evolved to become an organization putting up workshops, conferences and talks promoting STEM, and gender equality to young women all over the country


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IT Pro Portal

There is a general acceptance that there is a global security skills gap, almost three million security professionals according to (ISC), and expected to grow over the coming years. As competition for talent grows, it is more important than ever organisations reassess their approaches to recruiting and retaining top tech talent and look for new ways to secure their organisations, a growing trend is to move to the cloud. The key to retaining talent is opting for bold strategies that focus on investing in the right technology, nurturing talent, both inside and outside of the organisation, and not expecting the right people to come knocking at your door. We explore four ways to find and retain security talent.


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EuroNews

When we asked young people in the UK and France to name a female entrepreneurial role model whose values and ambitions aligned with their own, only 2% said they could. In Germany, this dropped even further to just 1%. The statistics speak for themselves – there is a chronic lack of female entrepreneurial role models in Europe. Sadly, this is also the case across the globe.


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Your Story

Happy birthday, my darling daughter. As I write this letter today, September 14, 2029, I feel like you were born just yesterday, and here you are, entering your teens. I must confess that I’m nervous about what this new stage of life will bring but I am also filled with hope about the world that you will step into – a world reset in 2020 after COVID-19.


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Forbes

Credit Karma, Canva, and Grab.* What do these companies have in common? All of these companies have either female CEOs or co-founders, and all are valued at well over $1 billion dollars. Coincidence? I tend to think not.


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Boston Business Journal

Alongside the finding that women in the Boston tech sector keep earning significantly less than their male counterparts, a newly released survey notes that women in tech are conditioned to expect less because they’ve been paid less for years.


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UC Berkeley

Sifting through the over 1,000 pieces of paper notes and hand-sketched drawings from the Julia Morgan collection at the Environmental Design Archives at UC Berkeley’s College of Environmental Design (CED), curator Chris Marino found an interesting trend.


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Center for American Progress

Key features of two quality workforce partnerships offer lessons on how workforce intermediaries and employers can design mutually beneficial relationships that connect working Americans — across racial and gender lines — to good jobs in the 21st century.


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There are already efforts underway to reshape the way that labor markets work to make them more equal. Here the Center for American Progress looks at a model in IT and one from the union SEIU.

Entrepreneur

I’ve been playing chess casually for about 10 years. I learned to play alongside my kids, now ages 16, 14 and 11, when they were young. Before I knew it, they were outplaying me. So while I was proud of them as a mom, as a fierce competitor I decided I needed to improve my game. And recently, I realized that the skills I developed playing chess were skills I could apply to my business.


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Forbes

Strong leadership is recognized as a collective effort, with the best decisions drawing on cognitive diversity and success builds on success. At a time when leaders are at their most stretched, the challenge is not only to get through the current crisis, but what legacy will this leave on diversity in leadership?


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Rappler

Rappler Hustle shares the stories of women who have made a name for themselves in finance, game development, physics, and tech


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Newsweek

Equal Pay Day — how far into a new year the average woman has to work to earn what the average man made the previous year — falls on March 31 this year, a couple of days earlier than in 2019. Progress? Hardly, especially in a leap year.


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Reuters

When Miriam Gonzalez started contributing data to the world’s biggest crowdsourced map from her Mexico City home five years ago, she found herself part of a rare and odd group of volunteers.


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Silicon Angle

There are many stories hidden in data, and companies are squirreling away for their insights. Revealing those stories often falls to the data science teams who build the models and creates the algorithms which seek out the wisdom within the data.


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Monitor (Uganda)

Even though the number of women is still relatively low, the critical roles which have been unapologetically taken up by women are impressive. A wealth of talented women have made significant strides in Fintech industry.


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