#4
single distill image banner

  • Susan Fowler’s memoir (#2)
  • Gender-neutral facial recognition (#19)
  • FemTech CEOs (#10)
  • Emotional labor? (#21)


Selection and ranking powered by

deepnews logo


Story Source
Forbes

Caroline Criado-Perez sent shock-waves with her book Invisible Women: Exposing data bias in a world designed for men (Chatto & Windus, 2019). Her argument focused on the wide-scale impact of bias and gaps in data impact gender politics in her book. She explains how our history has consistently removed the progress and impact of women’s accomplishments in our daily lives. Speaking to Forbes.com, Criado-Perez explains decisions that impact every aspect of our lives are based on the absence of gender-disaggregated data.


Editor’s Note:


The Nation

In Silicon Valley, every tech titan has a mythology. Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg is the boy prince turned despot. Apple’s Steve Jobs is a Herculean idol. And Theranos’s Elizabeth Holmes is an empress with no clothes. Depending on who you ask, the tech titans are selfish, evil, reckless, innovative, or touched by genius — anything, that is, but banal. Even among their detractors (perhaps especially for them), there is a natural affinity for this type of epical narrative.


Editor’s Note:


Articles about Susan Fowler, the former Uber employee, have appeared before on this Distill. Here Clio Chang writes on the memoir of “as interesting a person as you could imagine.”

D Magazine

When most kids were watching Saturday morning cartoons over a bowl of Corn Flakes, Anne Chow was mastering Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata in the hallowed halls of Juilliard. She started taking piano lessons when she was barely out of toddlerhood. Her parents had left Taiwan for the land of opportunity before she and her brother were born, and they expected their American progeny to take every advantage — school, sports, Scouts, and music — and see their talents to the limit.


Editor’s Note:


The Conversation

Sub-Saharan Africa’s burgeoning population of young people is considered one of its greatest untapped resources. Young men and women aged 15-24 constitute about a fifth of the total population. It’s a huge resource because, if well tapped, it could significantly drive productivity and growth.


Editor’s Note:


New Indian Express

HYDERABAD: Are you an aspiring woman entrepreneur who is biding time during the #CoronaLockdown? This could be up your alley. Biscuit brand Britannia Marid Gold on Monday launched the second season of its annual ‘Britannia Marie Gold My Startup’ initiative which provides financial assistance to homemakers with entrepreneurial ideas.


Editor’s Note:


Zocalo Public Square

In an emotional scene, earlier this year actor Patrick Stewart stopped by “The View” to ask co-host Whoopi Goldberg to join the cast of “Star Trek: Picard” for its second season, and reprise the role she had played in “Star Trek: The Next Generation” back in the 1980s. Goldberg hadn’t been an original member of that cast either, although she was a longtime fan of “Star Trek.” In fact, she credited the series with sparking her interest in acting, mainly because it was the first time, she had not only seen “a beautiful black woman who was the communication officer” of a ship and not a housekeeper, but “black people in the future.”


Editor’s Note:


Forbes

With schools and day care centers closed, there’s increasing concern about the impact on women. Lauren Hall, who is involved in running various Facebook groups with other mothers, told me “it’s clear that most of the women working from home now due to COVID are taking on more childcare responsibilities and have a much harder time getting away from the kids and housekeeping type responsibilities than do their spouses.”


Editor’s Note:


Politics Home

Just a few days ago we celebrated International Women’s Day and Commonwealth Day, it is therefore an opportune time to think about how the UK can promote trade and investment opportunities in order to empower women across the Commonwealth. The June 2020 Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (CHOGM) in Rwanda, will be a fantastic opportunity for the UK to build on its Global Britain agenda.


Editor’s Note:


CIO

The tech sector has made strides attracting more women and inching closer to equal pay. But a glaring disconnect remains in how men and women view gender diversity progress in IT.


Editor’s Note:


Tech Crunch

With women-specific health needs long ignored by tech giants, FLEX, the tampon replacement, raised $4 million and Nurx, the birth control delivery web platform, raised $5.3 million in 2016 (and went on to raise $93.4 million). Both companies became one of the top 10 companies out of more than 100 to raise the most money during their Demo Days at Y Combinator that year. By March 2017, it was reported that femtech companies had raised $1.1 billion since 2014, and the growth has only continued.


Editor’s Note:


Beyond women in tech more broadly, there is the sector of FemTech. Here Rae Witte looks into it for Tech Crunch, including looking at if “FemTech isn’t just for women.”

Silicon Prairie News

Carina Glover owned and operated a successful event planning business. She built her company from the ground up, working for free in the early stages of development, because she wanted to build a reputable name for her company. And she did. In her second year of business, she landed event planning contracts with the Grammy Awards and NFL Honors.


Editor’s Note:


Press Trust of India

“In general, we found that the percentage of women compared to men in any role was consistently below 50 per cent for all years from 1912 until now,” said study co-author Murielle Dunand, a former intern in Amaral’s laboratory and current student at Massachusetts Institute of Technology.


Editor’s Note:


Associated Press

RALEIGH, N.C. — Gonzaga and Michigan stood out in a study that seeded men’s and women’s NCAA tournament brackets based on graduation rates, academic success and diversity in the head-coaching ranks.


Editor’s Note:


Marie Claire

The past few weeks may have been filled with uncertainty, but one thing remains crystal-clear: kindness wins. The global coronavirus pandemic has sparked an outpouring of generosity and altruism among Australians, providing much-needed hope and comfort. It’s never been more important to support our communities, show compassion and find new ways to help our neighbours in need.


Editor’s Note:


Inter-Press Service

GENEVA, Apr 2 2020 – Globally, women are more vulnerable to economic shocks wrought by crises such as the coronavirus pandemic.


Editor’s Note:


MoneyControl

Entrepreneur Neha Bagaria had to take a long break from work after she had two babies. Sheryl Sandberg’s book ‘Lean In’ inspired her immensely in getting back on track.


Editor’s Note:


Human Resources Director

Mary Ann Yule is one of the most prominent and influential women in tech


Editor’s Note:


UC IT Blog

I am fortunate to serve as executive director of CITRIS (Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society), whose mission is to create information technology solutions for society’s most pressing problems. I also co-founded the CITRIS Policy Lab and the Women in Tech Initiative at UC. In my role as ED (together with the faculty director), I oversee the range of research and operations for the multi-campus research institute, one of four Institutes for Science and Innovation at UC.


Editor’s Note:


Technology Networks

When we look at the world, we don’t always see clearly. We can be tripped up by our own personal biases, or a lack of information. Facial recognition algorithms may help us change that.


Editor’s Note:


This article could also go in our Face Value distill. Algorithms and bias in algorithms often reflect the people who make them. Here Technology Networks about what it would look like gender-neutral.

Forbes

For most of us, relationships drive our worlds. Today – in an age of social distancing – people are finding new and innovative ways to stay connected. It is apparent now more than ever just how central human interaction is to our personal and professional wellbeing – but what about those for whom connection is a conundrum? That was the question Juliana Fetherman asked herself each time she looked at her younger brother, Michael. Diagnosed with both autism and ADHD, Michael Fetherman struggles with the interpersonal skills necessary for forming friendships, holding conversations and navigating unfamiliar situations. Though just two years older, Fetherman learned early on just how different the world was for her and her brother.


Editor’s Note:


SC Magazine

Shouldering extra responsibility for ’emotional labour’ is almost imperceptible when it enters the office uninvited, yet its one of the greatest barriers to having more women in tech and STEM industries.


Editor’s Note:


BBC

When American journalist A’Lelia Bundles published her first article about her great-great grandmother, Madam CJ Walker in 1982, it was in the “lost women” column of a women’s magazine.


Editor’s Note:


Forbes

Last year, pre-COVID-19, two of the most underserved groups — minority and women founders — were on the rise. However, “there is still a long way to go to close the gap for women of color,” Harlem Capital partners express.


Editor’s Note:


Daily Cal

UC Berkeley has a rich and diverse collection of clubs and organizations that aim to empower female-identifying students and help them enter male-dominated careers.


Editor’s Note:


American Inno

According to the American Association of University Women, in recent years only 20% of Advanced Placement (AP) computer science exam takers in high school have been female, compared to 48% for calculus, 59% for biology, and 34% for physics.


Editor’s Note:



($) = This source has a hard paywall. You will need to suscribe to view this article.