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  • Diversity in advertising (#2)
  • What are ‘manels’? (#19)
  • Silicon Valley’s Russian women (#5)
  • IBM survey on AI diversity (#23)


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South China Morning Post

Two years ago, Heng Ji, a professor at the computer science department of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, was invited to be a guest speaker at an academic conference in a Chinese city she had never visited before.


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A lack of representation is an issue around the tech world, and some women can compare different places they’ve worked. Here SCMP speaks with Chinese women who have worked in the U.S. about their experiences.

The Drum

Coronavirus is exacerbating societal inequalities, says the UN.


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Bloomberg Law

Three female employees at Oracle Corp. scored a major victory in court, gaining the right to represent thousands of others in a gender-discrimination lawsuit over pay, a legal milestone that has eluded women at other tech titans.


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Scroll.in

Scant historical records offer us glimpses into their lives


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EU Startups

In 2019, 92% of all funds raised by European companies from venture capital firms went to all-male founding teams. That is an overwhelming percentage. In 2020 we are still debating the role of women in tech, in venture capital firms or in leadership positions in general – even during a global pandemic where women are on the front lines everywhere in the world.


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Meduza

On April 23, Russian journalist and YouTube star Yury Dud released his latest documentary film — “How the World’s I.T. Capital Works” — about a handful of Russian startups that have found success in Silicon Valley. The three-hour video, which currently has more than 15 million views on YouTube, focuses on eight entrepreneurs, not one of whom is a woman. The oversight angered many viewers and led to allegations of bias against the filmmaker. So far, there’s been no response to the backlash from Dud himself, who might be surprised to learn that Silicon Valley has several Russian businesswomen. Meduza asked some about their work and what they think of “How the World’s I.T. Capital Works.”


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AFP

SINGAPORE: “Wow, your shirt is really see-through. Are you wearing matching underwear?” the man says lewdly. It´s a virtual reality simulation — but it´s enough to shock 23-year-old Elizabeth Lee into silence as the scene plays out on her headset. The VR technology is part of the Girl, Talk project which is aimed at helping women fight back against harassment in Singapore. “I would think that I would respond in a more confrontational way,” Lee admits. “It felt very physically close… it was just really disgusting to hear such crass remarks.


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Business Insider

In the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, many child care centers and schools have closed their doors, forcing parents to teach and care for their kids while also juggling work. Due to government-mandated closures and declining enrollment as parents fear disease exposure, some 60% of licensed child care providers have closed, according to a recent survey from the Bipartisan Policy Center, and many may have to close permanently. One in three daycare providers could permanently shut down if much more government aid is not allocated to the industry, multiple experts told Business Insider.


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Express Computer

Ever since the IT boom in the ’90s, India’s tech landscape has transformed tremendously over the years. While there were hardly any women to be seen in this sector early on, the power of women in the tech industry is quite evident now. In the early days, women employees faced male domination in the technological field just like any other mainstream industry, a perhaps overarching assumption that technology is predominantly for males. This resulted in a mental barrier for consumers, colleagues, employers, and clients alike. The pre-conceived notion of women being incapable of doing technological developments restricted their performance; not because of their lack of skills or ability, but because of the barriers created by their colleagues in the industry. Women felt outnumbered in the industry and believed men have more opportunities for career growth across all levels. Also, the role of a woman as the primary caregiver at home and patriarchal attitudes are other reasons for the lower representation of this gender in the business community.


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San Francisco Chronicle

A former Bay Area venture capitalist and his companies will pay $1.8 million to settle a lawsuit by the state accusing him of sexually harassing an employee and repeatedly touching her without her consent. The Department of Fair Employment and Housing announced the settlement Friday with Lee William “Bill” McNutt III, the Silicon Valley Growth Syndicate, which he co-founded, and International Direct Mail Consultants, which he owns.


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Portland State University

Susan Fowler turned Silicon Valley upside down in 2017 when she posted an essay on her website about the sexual harassment she experienced while working for Uber.


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Company culture is a big deal, but where does it come from? Here researchers in Oregon explain how the VC and private equity firms involved in startups may play a role.

Entrepreneur

The pathway for entrepreneurs is frequently filled with roadblocks, especially for women and people of color. But employing community-driven solutions to shape public policy can help overcome barriers to many of these entrepreneurs’ successes. To find solutions that work, it’s incredibly important that ideas for development are shaped within communities, instead of from outsiders purporting to understand a community’s perspective and needs.


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Princeton University

Andrea Goldsmith, a global leader in the development of wireless systems, has been awarded the Marconi Prize, the highest honor in telecommunications research. She is the first woman ever to win the prize, now in its 45th year.


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The Register

IT giant accused of paying women less than men doing exact same roles


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CNBC

The coronavirus pandemic has upended countless jobs and even entire industries, leaving many wondering which will emerge out of the other side. One industry likely to endure — or even thrive — under the virus, however, is artificial intelligence (AI), which could offer a glimpse into one of the rising careers of the future. “This outbreak is creating overwhelming uncertainty and also greater demand for AI,” IBM’s vice president of data and AI, Ritika Gunnar told CNBC Make It.


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Northeastern University

Northeastern University’s Center for Inclusive Computing has awarded the first round of grant funding to six higher education institutions, in order to help recruit and retain more women in their computer science programs and boost the representation of women in the field as a whole.


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CNet

The search giant’s diversity chief is also asked about workplace matters, including the corporate structure of her role and Google’s contractor workforce.


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The Next Web

CBI Insights’ grim sounding 2020 report entitled 339 Startup Failure Post-Mortems found that 70% of upstart tech companies fail. When it comes to consumer hardware startups, 97% eventually die or “become zombies.” And what were the top three reasons for startup failure?


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FirstPost

On 21 April, the International Paediatric Association organised a webinar on the needs of women and newborn, partnering with the World Health Organisation and United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF). It’s an important issue in these critical times, but something was odd about the poster the organisation shared on their social-media channels — not one of the experts invited to speak on a subject affecting the lives of women and children was a woman.


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Fast Company

What are the economic consequences of not taking a gender-sensitive approach to this crisis? What would such an approach even entail? How can we integrate advanced technologies and the future of work into our response efforts?


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JaxEnter

Women are underrepresented in the tech sector — myth or reality? Three years ago, we launched a diversity series aimed at bringing the most inspirational and powerful women in the tech scene to your attention. Today, we’d like you to meet Linda Schneider, Regional Manager at Computacenter.


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Thinknum Media

Northwestern Mutual Investment Services is taking a bespoke approach when it comes to matching prospective customers with financial advisors. It invites users on its website find a financial advisor based on criteria including financial goals, age, location, and income. All reasonable things to consider, to be sure, when one is looking for a financial advisor. This means that Northwestern Mutual has its entire directory of advisors. This also means that it has all of their locations and specialties. And, as we discovered, it means that, contained within the site code, is additional information about the advisors, including their gender (as determined by NoMu, not us). So we ran the numbers on the 7,500 advisors listed online, and as it turns out, the mutual company employs 87% male financial advisors, and, in some states, 100% of its advisors are male.


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ZDNet

Ninety-one percent of artificial intelligence professionals say increased diversity is having a positive impact on AI technology, but opinions vary based on country as well as gender, according to an IBM study.


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The issue of gender representation goes right to the heart of technologies such as AI. Here ZDNet follows a survey from IBM about inclusiveness and the effect that has on the confidence in the tech.

Salt Lake Tribune

Women in the U.S. are seeing disproportionate effects of the economic downturn during the coronavirus pandemic compared to men, reports show, and Utah is no exception.


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MoneyControl

Aparna K*, a techie with a top IT firm in Chennai, is now a homemaker. After giving birth to a son two years ago, Aparna could not extend her maternity leave nor was she able to get work from home facility approved.


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